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successful, the quarry's head is feat of no small difficulty and cut off, and the hawk after danger. being rewarded with the brain The beaters gradually drow is brought back for a fresh nearer. Precipitous places flight, and in this way the where they could not go were same hawk is frequently flown searched by huge rocks being many times in a morning. dislodged and rolled down.

In Chitral, falooners besides These went bounding and being masters of their own art crashing down the hillside, till have need to be skilled crags- with a huge splash they buried men, as their hawks frequently themselves in the water, fretake them among precipices quently shooting half - way and into the most dangerous across the river. By this time ground. There was none of the intervals between the this sort of cragsman's work chakor became longer, and to-day, but a little incident oc- they came in single birds, curred which showed us what turned out with difficulty from these falconers are capable of. rock crevices

and

other A young goshawk had been hiding - places, and all the thrown off at a chakor which hawks with the exception of swung round to the right to the Shunkar had been flown make across the river. The several times. By far the owner of the falcon was de- prettiest flights to watch were lighted to see his young bird, a those of the peregrines and tiercel, bind to his quarry in shahins, which stooped and mid air over the river, and struck their quarry to the carry him to the opposite bank. ground instead of seizing them It was necessary to take the in mid air. The Shunkar is hawk up as quickly as possible, not flown in these sorts of as he had not been flown at drives, but is reserved for game more than once or twice heron- and crow-hawking. before; so the falooner, in order The beaters gradually came to avoid going round by the up to us, a wild picturesque bridge, got across by worming lot of men, full of talk, and himself along the hollow stem anxious to hear about the of a thin poplar which served sport. The bag on this octo conduct a small irrigation casion was not very good comstream across the river. The pared with the number of poplar trembled and bent under flights that had been withis weight, and looked as if nessed; but this was owing either it or the side struts sup- to the high wind, which porting it must go, but luckily brought the birds down at a both held firm. The falconer, pace which frequently enabled after warily approaching the them, with the start

start thus hawk where he sat “deplum- gained, fairly to outfly the ing” the chakor, took him hawks. The total was fifteen up successfully, and returned chakor and a mallard. The by the same precarious way, latter misguided bird was flywith the hawk on his fist,-a ing down the river, and fell an

easy prey to one of the Mehtar's evolved. The Mehtar has built goshawks.

a small house on the river Though a few duck are found à mile or so above Chitral, about Chitral in the winter, the and during the duck-hawking regular duck - hawking season season his falconers remain does not begin till March, when there most of the forenoon, wild-fowl are travelling north-awaiting the arrival of a flight ward to the Central Asian lakes of duck. About this spot there after spending the winter on are a number of bays and backthe jhils and tanks of India, waters in the river, all of which where the good living they are flanked by walls built up of have been enjoying has put round boulders, to afford the them in first-class condition. falconers cover in approaching. The modus operandi, which it The drive over, we descended must be confessed savours and crossed the river. Preparsomewhat of poaching, is as ations had been made for a follows. After a settling of drive on the other bank; but wild-duck have been marked, owing to a report arriving of a usually in some sandy bay of large spotted eagle that had the river or a flooded rice-field, been seen to haunt the cliffs the hawking party stalk them lower down, in the direction in line. In the middle are the the driven birds would take, falconers, two or more in num- and which would have made ber, and at either end of the short work of

any

falcon comline is a man with a copper ing his way, the idea of a drive kettle - drum, generally bound there was abandoned. These with red velvet. On arriving spotted eagles (Spizætus nipalas close as possible to the duck ensis) are very common in Gilwithout being seen, the drum- git and Chitral, where they do mers commence a tremendous an immense amount of damage dinning, and the hawks, thrown amongst not only game birds, off at the same instant, are in but the young of ibex, markhor, and among the duck while they and corial too. The late are rising off the water. In Mehtar, Nizam - ul - Mulk, who this way often as many duck was passionately fond of hawkare bagged as there are hawks. ing, had one of them caught The rationale of the method and trained, report says with is simple: if the hawks are success; but their size and thrown off before the duck weight, not to mention their rise, the latter refuse to leave voracious appetite, preclude the water, and the hawks will their being brought into gennot attack them there. If, on eral use.

Nizam - ul - Mulk, the other hand, the duck get `Maga's' readers may perhaps well into their flight, they will remember, was the Mehtar generally outfly the hawks un- whose murder, which took place less a start is obtained from when he was out hawking, well above them; so to avoid started the conflagration which the double difficulty this in- ended in the Chitral campaign. genious method has been He was shot in the back while

SO

watching the flight of one of game went on, and it just his faloons. The present Meh- seemed a case of which of the tar, remembering his brother's two could last the longest. A fate, always has his back game it looked, for the crow guarded by men he can trust seemed to take matters wherever he goes.

easily, and evade his adversary On our road home we came with so little exertion, that one to a flat sandy plain, where the almost forgot he was playing river spread out below us into for his life. Suddenly a puff several glittering streams, and of black feathers. Habet! The where the Mehtar hoped to be two birds descend slowly to able to exhibit the prowess of the ground together, and all is his Shunkar on a crow.

Luck over. was with us, for some black The sun had long since flooddots on the water's edge were ed the valley, reminding us, if seen moving about. After the our appetites had not, that the head-falconer had assured him. day was getting on, and breakself they were not choughs, fast was still before us. So which decline to play the game, home was the word. We said he took his Shunkar up the hill good-bye to the Mehtar where above us, and sent a man to our roads parted, he gently put the birds up in our direc- deprecating our thanks for tion. As soon as they were on the morning's sport, and ten the wing, the falcon was thrown minutes later we were satisoff, and made a terrific swoop fying our hunter's hunger. on one of the crows; but when The morning had been his enemy was seemingly within which, for beauty of scenery a foot of him, the wily bird and general picturesqueness, cleverly, and apparently with- not to mention the wonderful out the least exertion, shifted skill exhibited by these hillto one side, and she missed. men in training the wildest of The rest of the crows flew off, God's wild creatures to do their and the field was left clear for bidding, will not easily be forthe contest. The falcon rising gotten; and half of us at the again, as if on the rebound, breakfast-table were ready to made another stoop, which was lament the invention of “vilsimilarly evaded, and another, lainous saltpetre,” that had aland another. Each stoop called most put an end in our own forth a groan of excitement country to so fascinating a from the onlookers.

For a sport. time this exceedingly pretty

R. L. KENNION.

one

A POOR MAN'S WEALTH.

BY GWENDOLEN PRYCE.

CHAPTER I.

same

THE room in which John to glance, in a furtive way Davies made shoes for the that was peculiar to him, at parish had originally been no the signs of the weather. more than an outhouse. The Neither he nor his clothes floor was of hard earth, un- ever seemed to grow percepttiled; the stone walls were ibly older. His hair, colouruncovered, except by the grimy lessly black, and cut abruptly diligence of generations of like the eaves of a thatched spiders. But a window of a roof where it reached his fair size — it was nearly half collar, showed no tendency to the length of John Davies turn grey. His shaven cheeks himself, and he was not quite and chin (clean-shaven on certhe smallest man in the dis- tain days of the week) had trict — had been let into the been fringed by the north wall, and with the addi- quaint frizzle of dark hair tion of two short benches, one since he had arrived at years to seat the cobbler and the of discretion and deliberately other to elevate and separate selected this style. His neat, his tools from the sea of scraps slim figure remained neat and about his feet, the workshop slim, and did the utmost poshad been accounted complete sible justice to garments which by its owner.

might have appeared disreputThe prospect from the north able on another man; and the window was as wide and clean hat that he wore, week-days and simple as the interior was and Sundays, indoors and out, cramped and untidy. The contributed something to the house stood upon the outer- effect of permanence in his most edge of a scattered appearance. group, and on the brink of

There

were actually two a long precipitous descent, so hats, soft, wide-brimmed, flatthat nothing could break or crowned felts, identically alike. block the view of level lands The Sunday hat, when its backed by a long straight sea- glory was gone, supplanted line. With this untrammelled its fellow, whose work was sweep of landscape before him, done, with the slow certainty the little white-faced man had of a natural process, so that sat day after day, with but the cobbler's small white face rare exceptions, for twenty and shrewdly ruminative eyes years, cutting and shaping, seemed to be shadowed always sewing and hammering, and by the same immortal brim. raising his eyes occasionally His customers had learnt to

SO

watching the flight of one of game went on, and it just his falcons. The present Meh- seemed a case of which of the tar, remembering his brother's two could last the longest. A fate, always has his back game it looked, for the crow guarded by men he can trust seemed to take matters wherever he goes.

easily, and evade his adversary On our road home we came with so little exertion, that one to a flat sandy plain, where the almost forgot he was playing river spread out below us into for his life. Suddenly a puff several glittering streams, and of black feathers. Habet! The where the Mehtar hoped to be two birds descend slowly to able to exhibit the prowess of the ground together, and all is his Shunkar on a crow.

Luck over. was with us, for some black The sun had long since flooddots on the water's edge were ed the valley, reminding us, if seen moving about. After the our appetites had not, that the head-falconer had assured him. day was getting on, and breakself they were not choughs, fast was still before us. So which decline to play the game, home was the word. We said he took his Shunkar up the hill good-bye to the Mehtar where above us, and sent a man to our roads parted, he gently put the birds up in our direc- deprecating our thanks for tion. As soon as they were on the morning's sport, and ten the wing, the falcon was thrown minutes later we

were satisoff, and made a terrific swoop fying our hunter's hunger. on one of the crows; but when The morning had been one his enemy was seemingly within which, for beauty of scenery a foot of him, the wily bird and general picturesqueness, cleverly, and apparently with- not to mention the wonderful out the least exertion, shifted skill exhibited by these hillto one side, and she missed. men in training the wildest of The rest of the crows flew off, God's wild creatures to do their and the field was left clear for bidding, will not easily be forthe contest. The falcon rising gotten; and half of us at the again, as if on the rebound, breakfast-table were ready to made another stoop, which was lament the invention of “vilsimilarly evaded, and another, lainous saltpetre,” that had aland another. Each stoop called most put an end in our own forth a groan of excitement country to so fascinating a from the onlookers.

For a sport. time this exceedingly pretty

R. L. KENNION.

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