The Complete Plays

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W. W. Norton & Company, 2007 M12 17 - 1136 páginas

"The most complete collection of the Russian playwright's repertoire."—Vogue

This stunning new translation presents the only truly complete edition of the plays of one of the greatest dramatists in history. Anton Chekhov is a unique force in modern drama, his works interpreted and adapted internationally and beloved for their brilliant wit and understanding of the human condition.This volume contains work never previously translated, including the newly discovered farce The Power of Hypnotism, the first version of Ivanov, Chekhov's early humorous dialogues, and a description of lost plays and those Chekhov intended to write but never did.
 

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LibraryThing Review

Crítica de los usuarios  - bowedbookshelf - LibraryThing

Chekov was an astoundingly prolific author, “publishing as many as one hundred and sixty-six stories between 1886 and 1887 while practicing medicine.” He’d been writing for magazines, newspapers, and ... Leer comentario completo

The complete plays

Crítica de los usuarios  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Translations of Chekhov's work have been reviewed before in these pages. The concern now, as then, is the ease with which a particular translation can be voiced by the actor. Director, writer, and ... Leer comentario completo

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Acerca del autor (2007)

Anton Chekhov was born on January 29, 1860 in Taganrog, Russia. He graduated from the University of Moscow in 1884. Chekhov died of tuberculosis in Germany on July 14, 1904, shortly after his marriage to actress Olga Knipper, and was buried in Moscow.

Laurence Senelick is the Fletcher Professor of Drama and Oratory at Tufts University and author of more than a dozen books, including the award-winning The Chekhov Theatre and The Changing Room: Sex, Drag, and the Theatre. He is director of his own translations of Gogol’s The Inspector General (1998) and Euripides’ The Bakkhai (2001).

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