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MANUAL The use of the
Legislature 1954 ria!

THE

CONSTITUTION

OF THE

STATE OF NEW YORK

As Revised, with Amendments adopted by the
Constitutional Convention of 1938 and Approved
by Vote of the People November 8, 1938

and
Amendments subsequently adopted by the Legis.
lature and Approved by Vote of the People

during the years 1939–1953, inclusive.

AS AMENDED AND IN FORCE JANUARY 1, 1954

ISSUED BY
THOMAS J. CURRAN, Secretary of State

Albany, N. ¥.

DOCUMENTS DEPARTMENT

JAN 19 1955

LIBRARY
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFOSNA

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TITLE PAGE OF NEW YORK STATE'S

FIRST CONSTITUTION-1777

M883536

CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTIONS

The first constitutional convention in New York State was held in White Plains in July, 1776, its work being completed at Kingston the following April. The first New York State Constitution was adopted on April 20, 1777, without submission to the people.

While there have been several revisions and many changes and amendments, in its outward form, the main structure has not been much altered.

The first Constitution continued in force without any change until 1801, when five amendments were added, four relating to the reorganization of the Legislature and one to the powers of the Council of Appointment.

Since 1777, there have been seven constitutional conventions in New York State, these occurring in 1801, 1821, 1846, 1867, 1894, 1915 and 1938.

The 1938 Constitutional Convention, consiste ing of 168 delegates, including 15 delegates-atlarge, convened at the State Capitol, Albany, at 12 o'clock noon April 5, and adjourned August 26. Revision of the Constitution was submitted to the voters on November 8, 1938, in nine separate proposals. Six amendments were approved, becoming effective January 1, 1939.

OF THE
STATE OF NEW YORK

As Revised, with Amendments adopted by the
Constitutional Convention of 1938 and
Approved by Vote of the People on

November 8, 1938

and Amendments subsequently adopted by the Legislature and Approved by Vote of the People

during the years 1939–1953, inclusive.
As Amended and in Force January 1, 1954

ARTICLE I

BILL OF RIGHTS § 1. Rights, privileges and franchise secured.

2. Trial by jury; how waived. 3. Freedom of worship; religious liberty. 4. Habeas corpus. 5. Bail; fines; punishments; detention of witnesses. 6. Grand jury; protection of certain enumerated

rights; duty of public officers to sign waiver of immunity and give testimony; penalty for

refusal. 7. Compensation for taking private property; private

roads; drainage of agricultural lands; excess

condemnation. 8. Freedom of speech and press; criminal prosecu

tions for libel. 9. Right to assemble and petition; divorce; lotteries;

pool-selling and gambling; laws to prevent;

pari-mutuel betting on horse races permitted. 10. Ownership of lands; allodial tenures; escheats.

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