The North-west Passage and the Plans for the Search for Sir John Franklin: A Review

Portada
E. Stanford, 1858 - 463 páginas
An account of attempts to discover the North-west Passage.

Dentro del libro

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

No encontramos ningún comentario en los lugares habituales.

Otras ediciones - Ver todas

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 359 - There appeared to have been an abundant stock of ammunition, as the powder was emptied in a heap on the ground by the natives out of the kegs or cases containing it ; and a quantity of ball and shot was found below high-water mark, having probably been left on the ice close to the beach.
Página 79 - It is far more probable, however, that Sir John Franklin, in obedience to his instructions, would endeavour to push the ships to the south and west as soon as they passed Cape Walker, and the consequence of such a measure, owing to the known prevalence of westerly wind, and the drift of the main body of the ice...
Página 202 - ... but as far as a man can be certain, who has one hundred and thirty pair of eyes to assist him, and all agreeing, I am certain we have discovered an extensive land. I think, also, it is more than probable that these peaks we saw are a continuation of the range of mountains seen by the natives off Cape Jakan (coast of Asia), mentioned by Baron...
Página 24 - that there is an open and, at times, a navigable sea passage between the Straits of Davis and Behriug there can be no doubt in the mind of any person who has duly weighed the evidence...
Página 37 - ... be arrested by ice of a permanent appearance, and that when passing the mouth of the Strait, between Devon and Cornwallis Islands, you had observed that it was open and clear of ice ; we desire that you will duly consider, with reference to the time already consumed, as well as to the symptoms of a late or early close of the season, whether that channel might not offer a more practicable outlet from the Archipelago, and a more ready access to the open sea, where there would be neither islands...
Página 359 - ... mark, having probably been left on the ice close to the beach. There must have been a number of watches, compasses, telescopes, guns, (several double-barrelled,) &c. ; all of which appear to have been broken up, as I saw pieces of those different articles with the Esquimaux, together with some silver spoons and forks.
Página 359 - ... under the boat, which had been turned over to form a shelter ; and several lay scattered about in different directions. Of those found on the island, one was supposed to have been an officer, as he had a telescope strapped over his shoulders, and his double-barrelled gun lay underneath him. "From the mutilated state of many of the corpses...
Página 359 - ... were now going to where they expected to find deer to shoot. From the appearance of the men, all of whom except one officer...
Página 359 - Oot-ko-hi-ca-lik), as its description and that of the low shore in the neighbourhood of Point Ogle and Montreal Island agree exactly with that of Sir George Back. Some of the bodies...
Página 359 - Esquimaux language intelligibly; but by signs the party were made to understand that their ship or ships had been crushed by ice, and that they were now going to where they expected to find deer to shoot. From the appearance...

Información bibliográfica