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2:34

ENJOYMENT - HAPPINESS, &c.

Too late I find how madly vain our toil
In search of happiness on mortal soil;
The gilded phantom we so dearly prize,
A moment glitters, then for ever flies.

The highest hills are miles below the sky,
And so far is the lightest heart below
True happiness.

BAILEY's Festus.
My life has been like summer skies

When they are fair to view;
But there never yet were hearts or skies,
Clouds might not wander through.

MRS. L. P. SMITH.
Pleasure's the only noble end,
To which all human powers should tend ;
And virtue gives her heavenly lore,
But to make pleasure please us more.

MOORE
Gone like a meteor, that o'er head
Suddenly shines, and ere we've said
6 Look! look, how beautiful!” —'t is fled !

Moore's Loves of the Angels
How deep, how thorough-felt the glow.
Of rapture, kindling out of wo!
How exquisite one single drop
Of bliss, that, sparkling to the top
Of misery's cup !-how keenly quaff'd,
Though death must follow in the draught.

MOORE's Lalla Rookh
For she hath liv'd with heart and soul alive

To all that makes life beautiful and fair;
Sweet thoughts, like honey bees, have made their hive
Of her soft bosom cell, and cluster there.

MRS. A. B. WELBY. ENTERPRISE - ENTHUSIASM.

235

There are some hours that pass so soon,
Our spell-touch'd hearts scarce know they end.

Mrs. A. B. WELBY
May thy soul with pleasure shine,
Lasting as the gloom of mine !

CHARLES WOLFE. Ah Pauline! who can gaze upon thee now

And watch thy cheek all beaming with delight, Nor grieve to think that thou so soon shalt know Despair, and grief, and sorrow's withering blight!

J. T. WATSON. May friendship open unto you

The path of peace and holy love; May life continual joys renew ;

May hope not too deceptive prove ;May sweet conteniment round you throw Such bliss as may be found below!

J. T. WATSON.

ENTERPRISE. — (See Activity.)

ENTHUSIASM - ZEAL.

No searea conscience is so fell
As that which has been burnt with zeal;
For Christian charity's as well
A great impediment to zeal,
As zeal a pestilent disease
To Christian charity and peace.

BUTLER
Zeal and duty are not slow;
But on occasion's forelock watchful wait.

Milton's Paradise Regained,

236

ENVY - EQUALITY.

His zea.

None seconded, as out of reason judg'd,
Or singular and rash.

Milton's Paradise Regained
No wild enthusiast ever yet could rest,
Till half mankind were like himself possess'd.

CowPER
On such a theme 't were impious to be calm ;
Passion is reason, transport, temper, here!

Young's Night Thoughts
For virtue's self may too much zeal be had :
The worst of madmen is a saint run mad.

POPE
-With all the zeal
Which young and fiery converts feel,
Within whose heated bosoms throngs
The memory of a thousand wrongs.

Byron's Siege of Corinth
And rash enthusiasm, in good society,
Were nothing but a moral inebriety.

BYRON'S Don Juan.
But faith, fanatic faith, once wedded fast
To some dear falsehood, hugs it to the last.

Moore's Lalla Rookh.

ENVY.-(See CALUMNY.)

EQUALITY — SUPERIORITY.

Consider, man; weigh well thy frame,
'The king, the beggar, are the same ;
Dust form'd us all. Each breathes his day,
Then sinks into his native clay.

Gay's Fables,

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Ask of thy nother earth, why oaks are made
Taller or stronger than the weeds they shade,
Or, ask of yonder argent fields above,
Why Jove's satellites are less than Jove !

Pope's Essay on Ilan Order is heaven's first law; and, this confest, and must be, greater than the rest.

Pope's Essay on Man. None but thyself can be thy parallel.

Some are,

To

passid,

cope with thee, would be about as vain As for a brook to cope with ocean’s flood.

Byron's Don Juan. As some fierce comet of tremendous size, To which the stars did rev’rence as it So he through learning and through fancy took His flight sublime, and on the loftiest top Of fame's dread mountain sat.

Pollok’s Course of Time. For mountains issue out of plains, and not Plains out of mountains; and so, likewise, kings Are of the people, not the people of kings.

Bailey's Festus

ERROR.

For he that once hath missed the right way,
The further he doth go, the further he doth stray,

SPENSER's Fairy Queen
More proselytes and converts use t’accrue
To false persuasions than the right and true,
For error and mistakes are infinite,
While truth has but one way to be i’ the right.

BUTLER

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"!

Even so, by tasting of that fruit forbid,

Where they sought knowledge, they did error find
Ill they desir'd to know, and ill they did,
And to give passion eyes, made reason blind.

Davies' Immortality of the Soul
Truth, crush'd to earth, shall rise again :

The eternal years of God are hers;
But Error, wounded, writhes with pain,
And dies among his worshippers.

W. C. BRYANT.

ESTEE M.

Love is not love,
When it is mingled with respects, that stand
Aloof from the entire point.

SHAKSPEARE.

For all true love is grounded on esteem.

BUCKINGHAM.

O, why is gentle love

A stranger to that mind,
Which pity and esteem can move,

Which can be just and kind ?

LORD LYTTLETON.

Take my esteem, if you on that can live ;
But, frankly, sir, 't is all I have to give.

DRYDEN.
She attracts me daily with her gentle virtues,
So soft, and beautiful, and heavenly.

JAMES A. HILLHOUSE

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