Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

194

DETRACTION - DINNER - DISAPPOINTMENT.

All the soul
Of man is resolution, which expires
Never, from valiant men, till their last breath ;
And then 't is with it like a flame extinguish'd
For want of matter-it does not die, but
Rather ceases to live.

CHAPMAN.
Entice the sun
From his ecliptic line-he shall obey
Your beck, and wander from his sphere, ere I
From my resolves.

BARON
Men make resolves, and pass into decrees
The motions of the mind : with how much ease,
in such resolves, doth passion make a flaw,
And bring to nothing what was rais'd to law!

CHURCHILL

DETRACTION.- (See CALUMNY.)

DINNER. — (See APPETITE.)

DISAPPOINTMENT.

My May of life
Is fallen in the sere, the yellow leaf;
And that which should accompany old age,
As honour, love, obedience, troops of friends,
I must not look to have, but, in their stead,
Curses, not loud, but deep, mouth-honour, breath,
Which the poor heart would fain deny, but dare not.

SHAKSPEARE. 'Things sweet to taste prove in digestion sour.

SHAKSPEARE

DISAPPOINTMENT.

195

sate itself

While in the dark on thy soft hand I hung,
And heard the tempting syren in thy tongue,
What flames, what darts, what anguish I endur'd !
But when the candle enter'd, I was cur'd.

From MARTIAL
Impelld with steps unceasing to pursue
Some fleeting good, that mocks me with the view,
That, like the circle bounding earth and skies,
Allures from far, yet, as I follow, flies.

GOLDSMITH's Traveller. Those high-built hopes that crush us by their fall.

CAMPBELL Successful love may

away,
The wretched are the faithful; 't is their fate,
To have all feelings, save the one, decay,
And every passion into one dilate.

Byron's Lament of Tasso. Thus ever fade my fairy dreams of bliss.

BYRON's Corsair. I loved her well; I would have loved her better, Had love been met with love: as 't is, I leave her To brighter destinies, if so she deems them.

Byron's Heaven and Earth. O! ever thus from childhood's hour,

I've seen my fondest hopes decay ;
I never lov'd a tree or flower,
But ’t was the first to fade away!

Moore's Lalla Rookh.
Oh! that a dream so sweet, so long enjoy’d,
Should be so sadly, cruelly destroy'd !

MOORE's Lalia Rookhe The hopes my soul had cherish'd

Have wither'd one by one,
And, tho' life's flowers have perish'a,

I'm left to linger on !

196

DISAPPOINTMENT

Such gather'd dust, when they had hop'd to see

The richest fruits; the buds that promis'd fair
Were early blasted, or but grew to be
A mockery—a harvest of despair.

W. C. Lopus
I will love her no more—it is heathenish thus
To bow to an idol that bends not to us;
Which heeds not, which hears not, which recks not for aught
That the worship of years to its altar has brought.

C. F. HOFFMAN.
Hope, cheated too often when life's in its spring,
From the bosom that nursid it for ever takes wing;
And memory comes, as its promises fade,
To brood o'er the havoc that passion has made.

C. F. HOFFMAN.
I knew not how I lov'd thee-no!

I knew it not till all was o'er-
Until thy lip had told me so—
Had told me I must love no more!

C. F. HOFFMAN.
The conflict is over-the struggle is past,
I have look'd—I have lov’d—I have worshipp'd my last ;
And now back to the world, and let fate do her worst
On the heart that for thee such devotion hath nurs'd.
To thee its best feelings were trusted away,
And life hath hereafter not one to betray.

C. F. HOFFMAN.
Ay, such is man's philosophy when woman is untrue,
The loss of one but teaches him to make another do.

Oh! I am sick of this dark world,

My heart, my best affections blighted,
My sails of joy for ever furld,
My dawning hopes so soon benighted.

J H. McILVANE

DISAPPOINTMENT.

197

The blighted prospects of an anxious life.

CHARLES SPRAGUE We have cherish'd fair hopes, we have plotted brave schemes We have liv'd till we find them illusive as dreams; Wealth has melted like snow, that we grasp in our hand, And the steps we have climb’d have departed like sand.

Epes SARGENT Farewell !

my
life

may wear a careless smile,
My words may breathe the very soul of lightness;
But the touch'd heart must deeply feel the while,

That life hath lost a portion of its brightness;
And woman's love shall never be a chain,
To bind me to its nothingness again.

EPES SARGENT.
The best enjoyment is half disappointment
To that wo mean, or would have in this world.

BAILEY's Festus. These were our hopes, but all our hopes are fled.

Not
every

flower that blossoms
Diffuses sweets around;
Not every scene hope gilds with light
Will fair be found.

Mrs. S. J. HALE. But it is past-bright, transient gleam

Of sunshine in life's dreary waste ;
Even as some half-remember'd dream
Of happier times,—'t is past—'t is past !

J. T. WATSON. As poison will sometimes cure poison,

As a nail other nails will expel,
This love you need not make a noise on,
For another may do just as well.

J. T. WATSON.

DISCONTENT.–(See CONTENTMENT.)

198

DISCRETION - DISEASE, &c.

DISCRETION. — (See CAUTION.)

DISEASE – HEALTH - PHYSICIAN, &c.

There never yet was a philosopher,
Who could endure the toothache patiently.

SHAKSPEARE.
By medicines life may be prolong'd, yet death
Will seize the Doctor too.

SHAKSPEARE.
About his shelves,
A beggarly account of empty boxes,
Green earthen pots, bladders, and musty seeds,
Remnants of packthread, and old cakes of roses,
Were thinly scatter'd to make up a show.

SHAKSPEARE.
Out, ye impostors!
Quack-salving, cheating mountebanks—your skill
Is to make sound men sick, and sick men kill.

MASSINGER
They are
Made of all terms and shreds; no less beliers
Of great men's favours, than their own vile med'cines,
Which they will utter upon monstrous oaths:
Selling that drug for two pence, ere they part,
Which they have valued at twelve crowns before.

BEN JONSUN
For men are brought to worse distresses,
By taking physic, than diseases ;
And therefore commonly recover,
As soon as doctors give them over.

Butler's Hudibras,

« AnteriorContinuar »