The debates on the grand remonstrance, November and December, 1641: With an introductory essay on English freedom under Plantagenet & Tudor sovereigns

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J. Murray, 1860 - 464 páginas
 

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Página 307 - And there appeared a great wonder in heaven ; a woman clothed with the sun, and the moon under her feet, and upon her head a crown of twelve stars.
Página 191 - There needs no more be said to extol the excellence and power of his wit, and pleasantness of his conversation, than that it was of magnitude enough to cover a world of very great faults ; that is, so to cover them, that they were not taken notice of to his reproach, viz.
Página 277 - Parliament, and conferring together upon the state of affairs, the other told him, [Hyde,] and said, ' that they must now be of another temper than they were the last Parliament ; that they must not only sweep the house clean below, but must pull down all the cobwebs which hung in the top and corners, that they might not breed dust and so make a foul house hereafter; that they had now an opportunity to make their country happy, by removing all grievances and pulling up the causes of them by the roots,...
Página 173 - I have eaten his bread, and served him near thirty years, and will not do so base a thing as to forsake him; and choose rather to lose my life (which I am sure I shall do) to preserve and defend those things which are against my conscience to preserve and defend : for I will deal freely with you, I have no reverence for the bishops, for whom this quarrel [subsists.]" It was not a time to dispute; and his affection to the church had never been suspected.
Página 267 - We confess our intention is, and our endeavours have been, to reduce within bounds that exorbitant power which the prelates have assumed unto themselves, so contrary both to the Word of God and to the laws of the land...
Página 176 - ... instead of moving his hat, stretched both his arms out, and clasped his hands together upon the crown of his hat, and held it close down to his head ; that all men might see how odious that flattery was to him, and the very approbation of the person, though at that time most popular.
Página 177 - In the last short parliament, he was a burgess in the house of commons ; and, from the debates which were there' managed with all imaginable gravity and sobriety, he contracted such a reverence to parliaments, that he thought it really impossible they could ever produce mischief or inconvenience to the kingdom ; or that the kingdom could be tolerably happy in the intermission of them.
Página 268 - And we do here declare that it is far from our purpose or desire to let loose the golden reins of discipline and government in the Church, to leave private persons or particular congregations to take up what form of Divine Service they please, for we hold it requisite that there should be throughout the whole realm a conformity to that order which the laws enjoin according to the Word of God.
Página 266 - But what can we the Commons, without the conjunction of the House of Lords, and what conjunction can we expect there, when the Bishops and recusant lords are so numerous and prevalent that they are able to cross and interrupt our best endeavours for reformation, and by that means give advantage to this malignant party to traduce our proceedings ? 182.
Página 21 - England,' it is declared and enacted, that no freeman may be taken or imprisoned or be disseised of his freeholds or liberties, or his free customs, or be outlawed or exiled; or in any manner destroyed, but by the lawful judgment of his peers, or by the law of the land...

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