Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

HOII' DJERICAN IANUFACTURERS MET THE WAR EMERGENCY

281

[merged small][ocr errors]

possible to obtain. At nine a. m. he made his problem known. Before noon he was placed in touch with two manufacturers who had scores of idle machines suitable for manufacturing women's wear. Arrangements were made, and now two factories that formerly manufactured gloves and trousers are producing women's wear.

A large railroad supply company closed its doors and laid off its men, many of whom were highly skilled woodworkers. The reason given was that the railroads were now purchasing steel cars, with steel furnishings instead of wood, as of old. Experiments were made to see if the class of woodwork used in wooden railroad cars could be used in homes. Indications were highly favorable. And now the railroad supply house is being kept as busy as ever with orders from contractors for "railroad woodwork" for use in apartment houses and bungalows.

Manufacturers of automobile speedometers, too, ran into trouble. They had been importing all their dials. American manufacturers could supply Aat dials, but not curved. big eastern manufacturer of motor headlight mirrors was approached with a proposition to supply curved speedometer dials. He was sure it could not be done -anyway, at the right price. Finally a starting order for two million dials tempted him to try to adapt his bending machinery to the manufacture of curved speedometer dials. He tried, and with the cooperation of the speedometer people, succeeded.

And 110W American speedometers have American dials — dials that hitherto had to be imported.

When it was found impossible to duplicate imported goods, notably raw materials, arrangements were made to insure uninterrupted shipments. . typical case is that of kapok-an East Indian fiber used for stuffing mattresses. Supplies had been coming over in German boats. Consuls of various nations not at war were called in to see if the goods could be brought over in neutral boats. In the case of kapok, arrangements were made with the Netherlands consul to bring it over in Dutch boats.

[graphic]

Maintaining a nice balance between Brain and Brawn in the building of a Boy calls for intelligent caution and care. Boys are not built with books or baseball alone. They are the product of intelligent feeding combined with rational outdoor exercise. The best food for growing boys and girls is

Shredded Wheat

It has all the tissue-forming, bone-making, brain-building material in the whole wheat grain prepared in a digestible form. The crisp shreds encourage thorough mastication which aids digestion and develops sound teeth and good gums.

Shredded Wheat is made in two forms-BISCUIT and TRISCUIT — the biscuit for breakfast with hot milk or cream, or with sliced bananas, stewed prunes, baked apples or other fruits. TRISCUIT is the Shredded Whole Wheat

Wafer, eaten as a toast with butter or soft cheese-a delicious substitute for white flour bread or crackers.

[graphic]
[merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small]

Made only by The Shredded Wheat Company, Niagara Falls, N. Y.

[blocks in formation]

knowledge that the manufacturer could easily adapt his machinery to the manufacture of the pump.

And as a result a new business has sprung up, and the manufacturer faced with a shut-down is running full time producing the new product.

Similarly a manufacturer of timestamps reported that he would be forced to lay off most of his men. He was introduced to a man who had invented a new motor cycle. At first the time-stamp manufacturer refused the proposition because of the inventor's lack of selling experience. Then a man with a successful selling record in the motor cycle business was called in. The three men got together, and now the time-stamp plant is manufacturing motor cycles.

Several of the railroads rendered valuable assistance in the matter of finding work for idle factories. They applied to the Association for lists of articles for which substitutes were required, and new articles waiting to be placed on the market; also for the names of manufacturers with idle machinery.

Then they wrote to their special agents and had them make thorough investigations in their respective districts to bring together the man needing a product and the man needing work for his factory. In a large number of cases difficulties were permanently bridged in this way.

Unlooked-for results came about in several cases through these investigations. A furniture manufacturer was throwing in an alley each week tons of waste. A box of this waste was obtained and submitted to an analytical chemist. He found cotton fibers in the waste. A sample of the waste together with the chemist's report was submitted to a powder company. Now the powder company has contracted to buy all the waste, and is using it to make gun cotton.

Likewise an aluminumware manufacturer was throwing out aluminum dust and clippings — useless waste," he called it, of no value. Investigation disclosed the fact that a live market existed for this "useless waste" among aluminum founders, and even peopie in the iron and steel business. And now the aluminum manufacturer, as well as the furniture manufacturer, are making money out of what they fornierly looked upon as junk.

[graphic]

Payments to policyholders were larger than

ever before, $39,273,810.05

THE PRUDENTIAL INSURANCE COMPANY OF AMERICA

Incorporated under the laws of the State of New Jersey

FORREST F. DRYDEN, President

HOME OFFICE, NEWARK, New JERSEY

Everybody is invited to visit the Prudential Exhibit on Life Insurance and Public Welfare, PanamaPacific Exposition, San Francisco.

TYPEWRITERS

BLUE BIRD

ONCORDARP

BARGAIN

PRICES Look at these bargains! Typewriters Rebuilt in our own Factories. Every machine

line of is guaranteed for one year.

BLUE BIRD MOTOR Remingtons $20 to $55 Smiths $18 to $40 Underwoods $35 to $60 Royals $25 to $45 L.C. Smiths $30 to $50 Olivers $20 to $35

BOATS We have others. Send for catalog describing them, and address of nearest branch office.

16, 18, 20-ft. Blue Bird boats ready to ship. AMERICAN WRITING MACHINE CO., Inc., 345 Broadway, N.Y. ||Thoroughly guaranteed and tested. Most

prac: tical family boats afloat. Combine handsome ap

pearance with speed, durability and seaworthiness. ENUS PENCILS Best material and workmanship throughout. En

gine Detroit two cycle reversible, guaranteed FIVE Made in 17 degrees (6B softest to 9H hard YEARS, only 3 moving parts, starts without crank. est) of never varying, uniformly graded ing, child can run it. Has auto boat seats. quality, also two copying. Write on letterhead for free trial sample and booklet.

SEND FOR FREE BLUE BIRD CATALOG TODAY

Demonstrator agents wanted everywhere.

American Lead Agent's price to each first user of a Blue Bird in VENUS

Pencil Co.

any locality. Ask also for BARGAIN SHEET on 20, 212 5th Ave.

21, 23, 35' Runabout Motor Boats. New York

DETROIT BOAT CO., 1164 Jefferson Ave., Detroit, Mich.

(EDITORIAL Note.- If any reader of this maga. zine has any good reason for wanting to be placed in direct communication with any of the firms referred to, or if he has a similar problem, he is invited to write to Mr. Anderson Pace, Industrial Commissioner, Chicago Association of Commerce.)

V

Rome flourished when she had live competition, and decayed after she had subdued the world. The more our competitors miake us hustle the better chance we will have to do something worth while.

A LESSON IN ADVERTISING FROM THE RED CROSS

283

A

[merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small]

ADVERTISING AND SELLING

DVERTISING and selling are not

the same thing,” says Glen Buck,

and he ought to know because he is recognized as one of the best advertising men in this country. “We have confused the two-to the detriment of both. Advertising is the force which builds a reputation for a commodity or service. Its proper function is to make the commodity or service as widely and favorably known as possible. Salesmanship is the force which cashes in’ on the reputation thus established.

"The fact that some things (or under certain conditions and at certain times all things) may be sold directly by written or printed words has led to a costly confusion. It is possible to advertise a commodity and sell it at the same time — but it is often tremendously more important that it shall be advertised only.

"Selling by printed words is at best an inefficient means. Van

power

is the most efficient selling power. Letters, circulars and printed appeals in the newspapers and magazines may produce a certain number of sales. They skim over the surface and collect a few easy orders. But this sort of matter is not advertising, properly speaking. It is merely printed solicitation—and may not in any way help to build a reputation for a commodity.

HECK over the list of adver

tisers whose first endeavor it is

to build reputations for their commodities, and you will have a list of successful businesses that have been built up with the aid of advertising. Cull out from the newspapers and magazines the advertisements that are endeavoring to do those things which the salesman can do best-and you will have a list of advertising weaklingsconcerns that are finding advertising a burdening expense.

"Advertising is reputation building. And a rightly used trade-mark is nearly always the best tool for the work. Could any possible arrangement of letters or words tell the story as quickly and forcibly as does the simple Red Cross emblem? I think not.

Speak the words and the emblem immediately presents itself to the mind's eye. L’resent the emblem to the eye, and all that it stands for is immediately suggested. One can scarcely think the term “Red Cross" without visualizing the emblem. It is a picture of an idea. And the human mind thinks in pictures - not in words or letters.

ADORA-Another dessert confection invariably popullar with the hostess. These little wafers are pleasing to look upon, entrancing to the taste, whether served with dessert or eaten as a. confection.

C

[blocks in formation]
[ocr errors]

llad it been called The First Aid to efficient use of the trade-mark idea as the "l'ounded Association' and has the Red Cross Association, there emblem adopted, the work would have woull now be a much keener and more been seriously handicapped, if not irre general appreciation of the power of trievably ruined, at the start.

advertising—and many more success“The Red Cross emblem is one of the ful advertisers." best trade-marks in existence. It indicates what a trace-mark should be. In

There are times when we think that a spite of the fact that it has never had little lie, a white lie, a joshing lie, any kind

of little immature lie, does no harm. But a big advertising appropriation back of

we cannot escape from this: That every it and has not been kept conspicuously thought we think, every word we speak, before the public, it has burnt its way

every deed we do, either strengthens or

weakens to some degree the fabric of chardeep into the general consciousness. acter. A little lie, a little misrepresentaEverywhere the Red Cross emblem in- tion, a little indulgence in any negative stantly commands the right of way. It

quality, will weaken character. Just as

á drop oi aniline dye will tint a hogshead tells its story at a glance.

of water, just as a grain of musk will scent “It ‘gets over' more quickly and more

room for twenty years, so will the in

dulgence in a slight negative or undesirable effectively than could any possible thought, word, action, Weaken one's arrangement of letters or words. Had

character. To be a great personality, one

must be patient in the doing of sınall goodsome of our big advertisers made as

nesses.-Thomas Dreier.

B.

a

IG vision went into the original conception of the Red Cross or

ganization. A fundamental principle of life was made wise use of by the adoption of its name and emblem.

or

W

[ocr errors]

A Snowy Line In Half the Time

Beautiful, snow-white garments, out early in the fresh morning breeze. A whole yardful washed, rinsed and wrung in less than two hours. Not a rip nor a tear. Not a button off. No fuss nor muss. Dry before noon, to be ironed the same day, getting two days' work finished in one.

All this is easy with a

Western Electric

away with

Washer and Wringer This wonderful household help is making electricity do the hard part of Monday's work in modern homes. It is the easiest, quickest, and cheapest method-and the safest.

Sold and guaranteed by the world's largest distributors of electrical supplies.

In the Western Electric Washer the clothes are gently rocked back and forth in hot suds, in a smooth, perforated, revolving cylinder. No attention to the washer is needed while at work. The mechanism which operates it is enclosed. The wringer is reversible. The whole apparatus is quickly cleaned after using. Attaches to any electric light socket and uses very little current.

COVERING TOO MUCH

TERRITORY
E DO not know whether this

is a true story or simply a

Chicago man's little joke, but there is a point to it anyway. The café of a certain Chicago hotel is regularly patronized by well-mannered business men who sit around the tables for a social hour in the late evening. The other night a medium-sized, ordinarylooking man came into the café and treated its patrons to a novel experience. There was nothing in the newcomer's appearance as he entered the room to make any one look at him twice. It was apparent at a glance that he had spent the earlier hours of the evening taking on board a considerable cargo of “be joyful" Auid, which he was navigating with dignity and precision.

Possibly the stranger was nettled by the evident indifference of his existence. 1 At any rate, he steered for the bar,

and in a voice that for an instant commanded the attention of the roomful, ordered a drink. He put the drink

a flourish; then, facing about, he glowered over the room, squared his shoulders, and announced : "I can lick any man in this room." No one paid the slightest attention to him. Turning to the bar again he said, “Bar

keep, gimme 'nother drink and make it | stronger." He drank it, faced the

room, squared his shoulders, and in a louder voice announced: “I can lick any man in the city of Chicago."

An expression of hurt surprise crept into the stranger's face, but he was game. And again he sought the bar. “Barkeep," he said, "gimme 'nother and make it the hottest you know how.” He tossed it down; then, taking a "Washington-crossing - the-Delaware" pose, and in a voice that made the glassware rattle he bellowed: “I can lick any guy in th' United States uv Merica." At this a quiet little man got up, walked over to the stranger, knocked him down, helped him up again, propped him against the bar, and asked in a mild, kindly way, "I say, friend, what's the trouble?” "Trouble?" said the stranger; "trouble wiz me is I tried to cover too blamed much territory."

Of course this fellow had absorbed his courage one at a time until he was not accountable either for his words or his actions. But how many of us in

our normal senses get into the same | trouble. We become inoculated with

the big-head germ because we have accomplished some little thing in some one place on this earth, and then with an ambition that is far in excess of our capacity, we branch out with the idea that we can cover the country.

[graphic]
[blocks in formation]

To crr is humanto brag about it, idiotic.

PROMOTION AND DEMOTION OF EMPLOYEES

285

[ocr errors]

and each alternate week there is a written examination based on a set of questions distributed before the lecture. At the end of the year each pupil must have a rating of seventy-five per cent. in order to pass. If he falls below that point he must reenroll and begin over again.

This personal record system and plan of school work was introduced by Arthur Williams, general inspector of the company, and is under the direction of F. C. Henderschott, a man who has taken a very active part in the promotion of industrial education.

For a small business, where the employer can keep in personal touch with his employees, such a system is not necessary; but even then some plan of keeping a record of each employee is of value. It often happens that a man who is not "making good" in one position can do

creditable work in another position; and sometimes a man who cannot get along with one manager or foreman works cheerfully and efficiently with another.

As Mr. Henderschott says, “Our estimate of a man depends upon the man himself, and we do not take the word of one person, or even of two or three persons about him. In addition to the survey which is made when he first enters the employ of this company, is added the frequent reports of his manager and the report of his school work. All is down in black and white. We do not discharge a man when his record is unfavorable from his first manager. We shift him to another position instead. A new record is started, including his "history with the company,' and reports of his previous work. These earlier reports are some

EMPLOYEES PROMOTE AND

DEMOTE THEMSELVES
N NEW YORK there is a large
public service corporation the em-

ployees of which can promote themselves, they can demote themselves, and it can even be said that they can discharge themselves, under a system which has been in operation for several years. This system is not influenced by opinion, whim or caprice. The record of every employee is carefully tabulated from the time he enters the service, and is opened with a "survey" of the man himself-his natural qualifications, education, general health, and the positions he has previously held. His personal appearance and characteristics are carefully noted. Following this first tabulation, are entered frequent reports of the manager of the department in which he is employed. These reports are quite comprehensive and include a record of his attitude toward his work-promptness, accuracy, need of supervision, whether he is adapted to his work or needs additional training, whether he is capable of filling a better position, his pronounced good habits, faults or bad habits. Naturally, these subsequent reports are not made until the man has been employed long enough for his manager to be able to form more or less definite conclusions on these points.

Under the old system, a man hired for some specific position. If he didn't "make good" in that position, he was discharged and someone else was given a trial. This old system is both expensive and wasteful, for it frequently happens that a man who ignominiously fails in one place may be a genuine success in another. Employers know that they cannot “fit square pegs into round holes or round pegs into square holes,” but until comparatively recently no comprehensive plan was inaugurated for sorting out the infinite variety of shapes to find the place for which they were created or can be trained to fill.

[graphic]

was

[blocks in formation]

ARCO WAND

[ocr errors]

A Training School for

Employees. HEN a man enters the employ of the New York Edison

Company, for that is the public service corporation using the personal record system outlined above, he is first placed in a training department and is assigned to minor duties, so that his capabilities and his attitude toward his work can be studied. The company also maintains three schools, and each new employee is required to take one of the courses. Classes are held during working hours, and the record made by each pupil is an important element in his promotion or demotion. Classes meet once a week,

In many exhaustive tests conducted by custodians of universities, colleges, institutions, department stores, etc., the ARCO WAND Vacuum Cleaners have performed 100% in suctioning more dirt out of the carpet after the competitive machines had quit trying. Make your own test: Clean your rug with your broom, portable or stationary vacuum cleaner, and then bring it to any of our showrooms and let us prove up! Seeing is believing.

The ARCO WAND is stationary—sits
in cellar or side room; runs by elec-
tricity (or gasoline, if desired). Works
through a single iron suction pipe run-
ning up in partition - wall about
central in your home. On each
floor, usually at baseboard, is

1/2 inch brass-covered open-
ing to piping, into which the end of a light hose is slipped.
Press an electric button to start the machine, and presto! the magic WAND or
cleaning tools instantly pass over ceiling, walls, floors-everything in the room
—and thoroughly exhausts all dirt, without raising any dusi.
The ARCO WAND does not clean house 40% as in broom-duster method
but it removes entirely the dirt, dust, trash, lint, threads, cobwebs,
moths, insect eggs, germs, etc. Everything can be cleaned – carpets,
draperies, ceilings, walls, pictures, upholstery, books, mattresses, dresser
drawers, furs, clothing, etc. Saves an hour or two every day for social
enjoyment.

A permanent, unfailing Cleaner, at $150 The ARCO WAND is a complete, practical, permanent cleaner-tested and proved efficient by three years' use in stores, schools, churches, theaters, hotels, garages, flats, farm and city homes. It is as easy as turning on the water faucet or the electric light. Accept no substitute! Bring

or side-room. your rug to our nearest showroom for test; or write for catalog (free).

pipe runs to each floor. Public showrooms in all large cities. Write today.

WAND Vacuum

Cleaners, hose and tools, Write to

816-822

are sold by all Heating Department

S. Michigan Ave.

and Plumbing Trade, in Chicago

sizes at $150 up. Price

does not include labor, Makers of the world-famons IDEAL Boilers and AMERICAN Radiators connections and freight,

Machine is set in basement

A Suction

ARCO

AMERICAN

RADIATORCOMPANY

C-2

« AnteriorContinuar »