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Mr. Gildon alfaresas, in his New Rehearsal, (p. 48.), ed one great work, he was taxed of boldness and “ That he was writing a play of the Lady Jane madness to a prodigy (4): If he took assistant in • Grey;" but it afterwards proved to be Mr another, it was contplained of, and represented as Rowe's. We are assured by another, “ He wrote a great injury to the public (1) Che lostielt herine * 1 pamphlee called Dr. Andrew Tripe (8');" ics; the lowest ballads; treatises against the face which proved to be one Dr. Wagstaff's. Mr. or church ; fatires on lords and ladies ; raillery Therbald afsures us in Mift of the 27th of April, on wits and authors; squabbles with booksellers ; « That the treatise of the Profound is very dully or ever full and grue accounts of món ters, poisons, " and that Mr. Pope is the author of it” The and murders'; of any hereof was there gothing so writer of Gulliveriana is of another opinion; and good, nothing so bad, which hath not at one or fuys, “ The whole, or greatest part of the merio of other season been to him ascribed. If it bore no " this treatise must, and can only be ascribed to author's name, then lay he cuncealed ; if it did, “ Gulliver (b).” (Here, gentle reader! cannot the fathered it upon that author, to be yet better but smile at the ftrange bliredness and politiveness concealed : If it resembled any of his tyles, then of men; knowing the said treatise to appertain to was iť cvident ; if it did nuit, then disguised he it none other but to me, Martinus Scriblerus ), on set purpose. Vea, even direct oppositions in re.

We are affured, in Mist of June 8. “ That his ligion, principles, and politics, have equally been "owo plays and farces would þetter havę adorncd fupposed in þím inhereut. Surely a most rare and « the Dunciad, than tKore of Mr. Theobald ; for he tingular character ; of which let the reader make “ had neither genius for tragedy nor comedy." what he can. Which, whether true or not, it is not easy to judge; Doubtless most commentators would hence take in as much as he had attenipred neither. Unless occafion to turo alt to their author's advantage, we will take it for granted, with Mr. Cibber, that and froin the testimony of his very enemies would his being once very angry at hearing' a friend's affirm, that his capacity was boundless, as well as play abused, was an infallibile proof the play was his imagination that he was a perfect matter of His own; the faid Mr. Cibber thinking it impof- all styles, and all arguments; and that there was Able for a man to be much concerned for any but in those titties no other writer, itt any kind, of any himself: “ Now let any man jadge (saith he) by degree of excellence, fave he himself. But a's this “his concern, who was the true mother of the is not our own resciment, we shall determine on ' child (i) !"

nothing ; but leave thee, gentle reader, to stopt Bat from all that hath been said, the discerning thy judgment equally between various opinion, seader will colled, that it little availed our author and to choose whether thou wilt incline to the to have any candour, fince, when he declared he testimonies of authors avoved, or of authors con. did not wrice for others, it was not credited'; as cealed; of those who knew him, or of those who hirele to have any modefty, fince, when he declined knew hïm not. writing in any way himself, the prefumption of

P: dihers was imputed to him. If he lingly enterprise

(Ay Burner's Homerides, p: I. of bis translation of (5) Character of Mr. Pope, p. 6.

the Iliad. (6) Gullia. p. 3.36.

(1) Thé 'ondon and Miff's Journals, on bis indet lij Cibber's Losta to Mr. P. p. 19.

taking the Odyfly.

Mig

'most cowardice to conquer. A man might as " dation, and ought to have been published in en “well triumph for having killed so many tilly flies age and country more worthy of it. If my tel" that offended him. Could he have let them timony be of any weighe, you are sure to have “ alone, by this time, poor souls: they had all been “ it in the amplest manner," &c &c. &c. " buried in oblivion (y)." Here we see our cxcel Thus we see every one of his works hath been Iene laureat allows the justice of the fatire ca eve extolled by one or other of his most inveterate sy man in it but himself; as the great Mr. Den enemies; and to the success of them all they do mis did before him.

unanimously give testimony. But it is fufficient, inThe said MR. DENNIS and MR. GILDON, far omnium, to behold the great critic, Mr. Dennis, in the most furious of all their works (the forecit- sorely lamenting it, even

from the Effay on Cri. ed chara&er, p. s.) do in concert (7) confefs, ticism to this day of the Dunciad! " A molt no“That some men of good anderstanding value “torious instance (quoth he) of the depravity of

him for his rhymes." And (p. 17.) “ that he has “ genius and cafte, the approbation chis essay meets

got, like Mr Bays in the Rehearsal (that is like “ with (6). I can safely affirm, that I never at“ Mr. Dryden), a notable knack at rhyming, and “ tacked any of these writings, unlefs they had « writing smooth verse."

“ success infinitely beyond their merit. This, Of his Essay on Man, numerous were the praises “though an empty, has been a popular scribbler. bestowed by his arowed enemies, in the imagina “ The epidemic madness of the times has given tion that the same was not written by hin, as it “him reputation (6). If after the cruel treatment was printed anonymously,

“ so many extraordinary men (Spenser, Lord BaThus fang of it even

con, Ben. Jonson, Milton, Butler, Orway, and BEZALEEL, MORRIS.

“ others) have received from this country, for “ Aufpicious bar)! while all admire the strain, "these laft hundred years, I should thist the scene, “ All but the selfish, ignorant, and vain ; " and fhow all that penury changed at once to riot *, whom no bribe to fervile flacrery drew, “ and profuseness; and more squandered away “ Muit pay the tribute to thy merit duc:

upon one fiobject, that would have fatisfied the “ Thy mule sublime, tignificant, and clear, greater pare of those extraordinary men; the “ Alike informs the foul, and charms the car." “ reader to whom this one creature should be un&c.

“ known, would fancy him a prodigy of art and And

nature; would believe that all the great qnaliMR. LEONARD WELTSTED

“ ties of these persons were centered in him alone. thus ivrote (w) to the unknown author, on the first “ But if I should venture to assure him that the publication of the said eßay; " I must own, after People of England had made fuch a choice, the

the reception which the vileft and most immor “ reader would believe me a malicious enemy, and « al ribaldry hath lately met with, I was surpris “ flanderer ; or that the reign of the last (Queen "ed to fee what I had long defpeired, a perfor “ Anne's) ministry was deligned by fate to en

mance deserving the name of a poet. Such, Sir, courage fools (d')." as is yout work. It is indeed above all commen But ic happens, that this our poet never had any

place, pension, or gratuity, in any shape, from the (y) Ciller's Letter to Mr. Pope, p. 9-12. said glorious queen, or any of her ministers. Althe

(3) In conccri.] Hear bow Mr. Dennis hatt prova owed, in the whole course of his life, to any court, ed our mistake in this place': " As to my criting in cor was a subfcription for his Homer, of 200 l. from “cert with Mr. Gildon, I declare upon the honour and King George I. and 100 l. from the prince and word of a gentleman, that I never wrote so much as princess.

line in concert wiib any one man whatsoever. And However, left we imagine our author's success Weferuio letters from Giidon will plainly four, that was constant and universal, they acquaint we of we are not writers in concert with each otber. certain works in a less degree of repure, whereof,

although owned by others, yet do they assure us . - The beight of my ambition is to please men of the he is the writer of this fort, Mr. Dennis (e) beft judgment; and finding that I bave entertained my aferibes to him two farces, whole names he does mujter agreeably, i bave the extent of the reward of not tell; but alurcs us that there is not onc jeft in

them; and an imitation of Horace, whose eitle he "Sir,

does not mention; but affurcs us it is much more I bed not ile opportunity of bearing of your excele execrable than all his works (S). The Daily Fox. lent pomp biet till ibis day. I am infinstely satisfied and nal, May 11. 1728, assures Us,

" He is below Tonn pleased with it, ard Lope you will meet with that en “ Durfey in the drama; because, as that writer couragement your admirable performance deserves,' &c. " thinks, the Marriage-hater matched, and the

"CH GILDON.' “ Boarding school, are becter than the What d'ye “ Now, is it not plain, that any one who fends such “ call it;" which is not Mr. P.'s, but Mr. Gay's. complimients to another, has not been used to write in partner frip witb bim to wbom be fends tbem??" Den (6) Dernis, prof. lo bis Rifleet. on ibe tbe Ejay ex nis, remarks on the Dunciad, p. 50. Mir. Dennis is tbere-Criticism. fore welcome to take this piece to bim:felf.

(c) Preface to bis remarks on Homer. (a) In a better under bis own bard, dated Marcb (d) Rem. on Homer, p. 8, 9. (c) 16. p. 8.

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Mr. Gildon alluresas, in his New Rehearsal, (p. 48.), ed one great work, he was taxed of boldness and “ That he was writing a play of the Lady Jane madness to a prodigy (): If he cook assistane in • Geey;" but it afterwards proved to be Mr another, it was contplained of, and represented as Rowe's. We are assured by another, “ He wrote a great injury to the public (1) Che loftieft herine “ a pamphlet called Dr. Andrew Tripe (8');" | ics; the lowest balla'ds; treatises against the face which proved to be one Dr. Wagstaff's. Mr. or church; satires on fords and ladies ; raillery Theobald assures us in Mift of the 27th of April, on wits and authors; squabbles with booksellers ; * That the treatise of the Profound is very dullo or ever full and grue accounts of mon ters, poisons, " and that Mr. Pope is the author of it" The and murders'; of any hereof was there oothing so writer of Gulliveriana is of another opinion; and good, nothing so bad, which hath not at one or says, " The whole, or greatest part of the merio of other season been to him ascribed. If it bore no " this treatise muft, and can only be ascribed to author's name, then lay he concealed; if it did, Gulliver (b)." (Here, gentle reader! cannot the fathered it upon that author, to be yet better but smile at the strange blirdness and poliriveness conccaled: If it resembled any of his ftylcs, then of mea; knowing the said treatise to appertain to was iť evident; if it did nue, then disguised he is none other bue ro me, Martinus Scriblerus ), on set purpose. Yea, even dired oppositions in re.

We are assured, in Milt of June 8. “ That his ligion, principles, and politics, have equally been "own plays and farces would þetter havę adorned supposed in him inbereut. Surely a most rare and * the Danciad, than those of Mr. Theobald ; for he fingular chara&er; of which let the reader make " had neither genius for tragedy nor comedy," what he can. Which, whether true or not, it is no easy to judge; Doubtless most commentators would hence take in as much as he had attenipred neither. Unless occafton to turn alt tu their author's advantage, we will take it for granted, with Mr. Cibber, that and froin the testiónony of his very enemies would his being once very angry at hearing a friend's affirm, that his capacity was bounders, as well as Hay abused, was an infallibile proof the play was his imagination that he was a perfect matter of His own; the said Mr. Cibber thinking it impor-all styles, and all arguinents; and that there was Able for a man to be much concerned for any but in those tiñnes no other writer, irr any kind, of any himself: “ Now let any man jatge (saith he) by degree of excellence, fave he himself. But as this “his concern, who was the true mother of the is not our own senciment, we shall decermine o i “ child (i)!"

nothing ; but leave thee, gentle reader, to toer But from all that hath been said, the discerning thy juryment equally between various opinion , seader will collect, that it little availed our author and to choose whether thou wilt incline to the to have any candour, fince, when he declared he testimonies of authors avoided, or of authors condid not write for others, it was not credited"; as cealed; of those who knew him, or of those who krtle to have any modefty, fince, when he declined knew him not. writing in any way himself, the prefumption of

P. Oihers was imputed to him. If he lingly enterpris.

(Hy Burnet's Homerides, pis. of bis translation of (3) Character of Mr. Pepe, p. 6.

tbe Iliad. (6) Gulliv. p. 336.

(1) Thé 'ondon and Miff's Journals, oni bis inderio lij Cibber's Letta 16 Mr. P. p.19.

taking ibor Odyfty.

Mi

MARTINUS SCRIBLERUS

OF THE PO E M.

This poem, as it celebrateth the most grave and We shall next declare the occasion and the cause ancient things, Chaos, Night, and Dulness; so is which moved our poet to this particular work. it of the most grave and ancient kind. Homer He lived in those days, when after Providence (faith Aristotle) was the first who gave the form, had permitted the invention of printing as a ana (faith Horace) who adapted the measure to scourge for the fins of the learned) paper also be-. . heroic poesy. But even before this, may be ration came fo cheap, and printers so numerous, that a de ally presunied from what the ancients have left luge of authors covered the land : whereby not written, was a piece by Homer composed, of like only the peace of the honest unwriting subject was nature and matter with this of our poet. For of daily molested, but unmerciful demands were made epic fort it appeareth to have been, yet of matter of his applause, yea of his money, by such as would furely not unpleasant; witness what is reported neither earn the one, nor deserve the other. At of it by the learned Archbishop Euftachius, in the same time, the licence of the press was such, Odys. x. And accordingly Aristotle, in his Poes that it grew dangerous to refuse them either : for tics, chap. iv, doth further set forth, that as the Ili- they would forthwith publish flanders unpunished, ad and Odysey gave example to tragedy, so did the authors being anonynious, and kulking under this poem to comedy its first idea.

the wings of publithers; a set of men who neither From these authors also it should seem, that the scrupled to vend either calumny or blasphemy, as hero, or chief personage of it was no less obscure. long as the town would call for it. and his understanding and sentiments no less quaint (a) Now our author, living in those times, did. and Itrange (if indeed not more fo) than any of conceive it an endeavour well worthy an honeft the actors of our poem. Margites was the name of satirift, to diffuade the dull, and punish the wickthis personage, whom antiquity recordeth to have ed, the only way that was left. In that publicheen Dunce the first; and surely, from what we fpirited view he laid the plan of this poem, as the hear him, not unworthy to be the root of so spread-greatest service he was capable (without much ing a tree, and so numerous a posterity. The poem, hurt, or being Nain) to render his dear country. therefore, celebrating him, was properly and ab- First, taking things from their original, he consolutely a Dunciad; which though now unhappily lidereth the causes creative of such authors, nameloft, yet is its nature sufficiently known by the in- ly Dulness and Poverty ; the one born with them, fallible tokens aforesaid. And thus it doth appear, the other contracted by neglect of their proper ta. zhat the firâ Dunciad was the first epic poem writ- lents, through self-conceit of greater abilities. This ten by Homer himself, and anterior even to the truth he wrappeth in an allegory (6) (as the con. Iliad or Odyssey

struction of epic poesy requireth), and feigns that Now, forasmuch as our poet hath translated one of these goddesses had taken up her abode with those two famous works of Homer, which are yet the other, and that they jointly inspired all such' left, he did conceive it in some sort his duty to writers, and such works. (c) He proceedeth to imitate that also which was lost; and was there- ftow the qaalities they bestow on these authors, fore induced to be tow on it the same form which and the effects they produce (d): then the mateHomer's is reported to have had, namely that of rials, or stock, with which they furnish them (@), epic poem; with a title also framed after the an and, above all, that self-opinion (f) which causeth cient Greek manner, to wit, that of Dúnciad. it to seem to themselves vastly greater than it is,

Wonderful it is, that fo few of the moderns have and is the prime motive of their setting up in this been stimulated to attempt fome Dunciad! since, in the opinion of the multitude, it might cost less (a) Vide Boff«, Du Poem Epique, chap. viiij pain and coil than an imitation of the greater epic. (6) Boffu, chap. vii. But poflìble it is also, that on due reflection the (c) Book i. ver. 32. *c. maker might find it easier to paint a Charlemagne, (d) Ver. 45. to 54. a Brute, or a Godfrey, with just pomp, and dignity (2) Ver. 57. to 77.

Tad and sorrý merchandise. The great power of them," a parcel of poor wretches, so many filly these goddesses acting in alliance (whereof as the “ Aies (i):” but adds, our author's wit is remarka one is the mother of industry, so is the other of ably " more bare and barren, whenever it would plodding) was to be exemplified in some one great “ fall foul on Cibber, than upon any other person and remarkable action : (3) and none could be “ whatever." more so than that whkh our poet hath chofen, viz. The descriptions are singular; the comparisons the restoration of the reign of Chaos and Night, very quaint; the narration various, yet of one by the ministry of Dulness their daughter, in the colour : the purity and chastity of diction is so semoval of her imperial seat from the city to the preserved, that in the places most suspicious, not polite world; as the action of the Æneid is the the words, but only the images have been censurrestoration of the empire of Troy, by the removal ed; and yet are those images no other than have of the race from chence to Latium. But as Homer been sanctified by ancient and classical authority ángeth only the wrath of Achilles, yet includes in (though, as was the manner of those good times, his poem the whole history of the Trojan war; in not lo curiously wrapped up), yea, and commentLike manner, our author hath drawn into this fin- ed upon by the most grave do&tors, and approve gle adion the whole history of Dulness, and her ed critics. children.

As it beareth the name of epic, it is thereby A person mult next be fixed upon to support fubject to such fevere indispenfible rules as are this adion. This phantom in the poet's mind must laid on all neoterics, a strict imitation of the ana . have a name (6), he finds it to be i and cients; insomuch that any deviation, accompanied he becomes of course the hero of the poem.. with whatever poetic beauties, hath always beenz

The fable being thus, according to the best es-censured by the found critic. How exact that line ample, one and entire, as contained in the prope-mitation hath been in this piece, appeareth not onfition; the machinery is a continued chain of ally by its general structure, but by particular ilh legories, setting forth the whole power, ministry, fions infinite, many whereof have escaped both the and empire of Dulness, extended through her sub commentator and poet himself; yea divers, by his ordinate intruments, in all her various operations. exceeding diligence, are so altered and interwov

This is branched into episodes ; each of which en with the rest, that several have already been, bath its moral apart, though all conducive to the and more will be, by the ignorant, abused as al main end. The crowd affembled in the second together and originally his owo. book, demonstrates the design to be more extensive In a word, the whole poem proveth itself to be than to bad poets only; and that we may expect the work of our author, when his faculties were other cpisodes of the patrons, encouragers, or pay-in full vigour and perfection; at that exact time masters of fuch authors, as occasion shall bring them when years have ripened the judgnieni, without forth. And the third book, if well considered, diminishing the imagination:which, by good seemeth to embrace the whole world. Each of critics, is held to be punctually at forty. For at the games relateth to some or other vile class of that season it was that Virgil finished his Georwriters: the first concerneth the plagiary, to whom gics; and Sir Richard Blackmore at the like age he giveth the name of Moore; the second, the dio compoling his Arthurs; declared the same to be bellous novelist, whom he styleth Eliza; the third, the very acne and piech of life for epic poesy = the flattering dedicator ; the fourth, the bawling though since he hath altered it to fixty, the year critic, or noisy poet; the fifth, the dark and dirty in which he published his Alfred (k). True it isa party-writer; and so of the reft ; alligning to each that the talents for criticism, namely smartness, some proper name or other, such as he could find. quick censure, vivacity of remark, certainty of af.

As for the characters, the public hath already leveration, indeed all but acerbity, feem rather the acknowledged how justly they are drawn: the gifts of youth, than of riper age: but it is far manners are so depided, and the sentiment so pe otherwise in poctty; witness the works of Mr. culiar to those to whoni applied, that surely to Rymer and Mr. Dennis; who beginning with cri. transfer them to any other or wiser personage, ticism, became afterwards such poets as no age would be exceeding difficult : and certain it is, hath paralleled. With good reason, therefore, did that every person concerned, being consulted apart, our author choofe to write his effay on that suta hath readily owned the resemblance of every por-ject at twenty, and reserve for his maturer years trait, his own excepted. So Mr. Cibber calls this great and wonderful work of the Dunciado (8) Ibid. cbap vii. viii.

(i) Cibber's letter to Mr. P. P. %, 12, 41. (b) Belfu, ebap. viii. Vide Arist. Poet, cop. ix. (4) See bis Elays.

Mij

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