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The Plates will not be numbered or paged, but left with a blank No., so that each Class of Fruit may be bound up by itself, arranged alphabetically, according to the season of ripening, or in any other way, when the Work is completed, or together as issued, at the option of Subscribers. Twelve Numbers will complete a Volume, which will be furnished with a Title Page and Index. A list of Subscribers will accompany each Volume.

The First Number was issued in APRIL, 1847, and the succeed

ing Numbers will appear on the First of every alternate month.

No. I contained the following varieties of fruits :

BEURRE D' AREMBERG PEAR,
GLOUT MORCEAU PEAR,
Van Mons LEON LE CLERC PEAR,
BALDWIN APPLE.

No. II will appear the 1st of July, and will contain the following :

VICOMPTE DE SPOELBERCH PEAR,
WINTER Nelis Pear,
ŞIEULLE PEAR,
NORTHERN SPY APPLE.

TERMS OF SUBSORIPTION:

In Royal Octavo, richly colored, at $ 1 per number, payable on delivery. A limited number of impressions in Imperial quarto, very

highly finished, $2 per number.

BOSTON:

PUBLISHED BY C. C. LITTLE AND J. BROWN, 112, WASHINGTON STREIT ;

HOVEY & CO., 7, MERCHANTS Row.

NEW YORK:
D. APPLETON & Co., 200 BROADWAY.

PHILADELPHIA:
G. S. APPLETON, CHESTNUT STREET.

Van Houtte's Nursery at Ghent, Belgium,

SPIREA PRUNIFOLIA FLORE PLENO,

DOUBLE FLOWERING JAPAN SPIRÆA.

(See Magazine of Horliculture, of June, 1847, p. 258, with a Woodcut.)

[graphic]

Pretty strong bushy plants (14 feet high,) of this very splendid shrub, perfectly hardy, (having sustained at Ghent a cold of 0° Fahrenheit, equal ta_15° Reaumur, without the least covering,) and in full blossom, will be

sent out the first week of next April, by rotation, (plants three years old.) Early applications will secure the finest specimens.

The stock of this magnificent Japan novelty, bought at Dr. Siebold's sale, is now in the possession of Louis Van Houtte, Florist, at Ghent.

Price, for pretty strong bushy plants, (all covered with flower-buds,) each, ll. ls. (free to London.)

M. Louis Van Houtte has got the favor to send to Dr. LINDLEY a branch of this shrub in full blossom ; its flowers are quite similar to those of the double-white Bachelors' Buttons (Ranunculus.)

FIRST LIST OF SUBSCRIPTIONS FOR THE DOUBLE FLOWER

ING JAPAN SPIRÆEA.

(Subscribers for 1,6, 12 plants and more.) MM.

MM. 1. Miellez, Lisle.

25. Alex. Chauvière, Paris. 2. Von Arthaber, Vienna.

26. Rivers, Sawbridgeworth. 3. D. Spae, Ghent.

27. Appelius and Eichel, Erfurth. 4. Ch. Van Geert, Antwerp. 28. Charton, Lyon. 5. Holandre, Metz.

29. M. Vetillard, Le Mans. 6. J. B. Rendauler, Nancy. 30. Ferd. Deppe, Berlin. 7. Joseph Ratzier, Paris.

31. D. Boll, New York. 8. Keteleer, Paris.

32. Ch. J. Schlachter, Loos. 9. Mad. Freeman, Noyon. 33. Prince Camille de Rohan, 10. Et. Armand, Lyon.

Prague. 11. Ad. Seneclauze, Bourg-Argen- 34. Léon Oursel, Le Havre. tal.

35. Count Ch. Aitems, Graetz 12. Crousse, Nancy.

(Sıyria.) 13. Aug. & Nap. Baumann, Boll- 36. Count Búbrinsky, St. Peterswiller.

burgh. 14. Gotteland, Chambery.

37. Alex. de Potemkin, Nijnj-Nov15. H. Demay, Arras.

gorod. 16. Oudin ainé et fils, Lisieux. 38. V. de Karemzine, Koursk. 17. M. Desgasches, Lyon.

39. Jugh Low & Co., Clapton. 18. Transon-Gombault, and Dau- 40. Knight & Perry, Chelsea. vesse, Orleans.

41. Garraway, Mayes & Co., Bris19. Souchet, Bagnolet.

tol. 20. Jacquin ainé, Paris.

42. Fuller, Worthing. 21. Jos. Manetti, Monza.

43. E. S. Burton, Esq., Daven22. Derussy, Macon.

try. 23. Horticultural Society of Nan- 44. S. & J. Rinz, Frankfort.ontes.

Main, 24. L. Jacob-Makoy, Liege. 45. Hovey & Co., Boston, Mass.

Orders for the Spiræa prunifòlia flore-pleno can be sent also to Mr. Fred. Warner, Seedsman, Cornhill, London, from whom a drawing of this shrub can be obtained on prepaid application; and also drawings of the Double-flowered Rhododendron, and of the Funkia grandiflora.

OF

HORTICULTURE.

JUNE, 1847,

ORIGINAL COMMUNICATIONS.

Art. I. Guano, and its Application to Fruit Trees.

By the Editor

The use of Guano for Horticultural purposes is steadily gaining friends, and, although much has already appeared in our pages upon the subject, and numerous pamphlets published, there is still, with many, a great prejudice against its use in any form in gardens. Some allege that it possesses no virtue; others, that it is altogether too powerful; while by far the greater part of cultivators have not made any experiments with it, but quietly await the results, after others have failed or succeeded in their endeavors to introduce so economical and valuable a fertilizer.

Since the first introduction of Guano, we have annually made use of considerable quantities, and tried it upon a variety of trees, shrubs, plants, flowers, vegetables, &c., and in no case but with the most marked success, unless we except some few pot plants, when it was used, through negligence, too strong. We have an account of an experiment we tried in laying down an old pasture to grass, the results of which were so much beyond our expectations that we intend soon to publish it. For the present, we have only room to offer a few hints on its application to Fruit Trees, this being just the season for that purpose.

Mr. Teschemacher, whose articles on the use of guano have occasionally appeared in our pages, formerly recommended its application in a liquid state, but more recently, in his treatise on the subject, he has advised its direct application to the soil, as the insoluble portion contains the chief substance of VOL. XIII.NO. VI.

23

which the seed is composed. Separate from the extra labor which its application in a liquid state would require, we are decidedly of opinion that the trees are much more benefited by its incorporation with the soil, where the roots may find food as they require it.

The object with all judicious cultivators is to keep the roots of trees as near the surface of the ground as possible, where they will more readily receive the benefit of light rains, the genial warmth of the surface soil, and the action of the air upon the roots, a subject too often löst sight of, especially in heavy soils. It is for this reason that, in such soils, we do not recommend the use of guano alone, but only in connection with some well decomposed manure, which, acting mechanically, by loosening the soil, and rendering it more permeable to air, the roots can more readily extend in search of nourishment.

Reasoning thus, we have applied Guano to our specimen fruit trees, particularly pears, which are planted on the borders of the walks, six to eight feet apart, at the rate of a pound to each tree, (four to six years old,) strewed equally over the width of the border, and immediately dug in, a thin coat of manure having been first given. This is done early in June, when the borders are usually dug.

The results of this single application have been surprising. The trees have grown with rapidity, making short-jointed and stocky shoots, and, with a judicious summer-pruning, ripening perfectly well. A portion of the trees are on the quince stock, and the others on pear; but we make no difference in the application of guano to each.

Our advice, therefore, is, to all who have fine trees which they are desirous of forwarding in a vigorous and healthy manner, to apply guano as we have recommended. On trees planted the present year, a half pound to each tree will be ample, spreading it within a circle of three feet from the tree: to those two years planted, a pound each may be applied ; and to those older, the quantity may be increased slightly; always strewing it on evenly, and digging it in to the depth of a few inches with the spade.

At a future time, we shall continue an account of our experiments with guano on forest trees, shrubs, grape vines, roses, &c.

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