The English Voyages of the Sixteenth Century

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J. MacLehose, 1906 - 204 páginas

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Página 180 - It gives me wonder great as my content To see you here before me. O my soul's joy ! If after every tempest come such calms, May the winds blow till they have waken'd death.
Página 2 - Afric of the other, and so many other under-kingdoms that the player, when he cometh in, must ever begin with telling where he is ; or else the tale will not be conceived. Now ye shall have three ladies walk to gather flowers, and then we must believe the stage to be a garden. By and by we hear news of shipwreck in the same place, and then we are to blame if we accept it not for a rock.
Página 180 - Never, lago. Like to the Pontic sea, Whose icy current and compulsive course Ne'er feels retiring ebb, but keeps due on To the Propontic and the Hellespont...
Página 173 - The true artificer will not run away from Nature, as he were afraid of her, or depart from life and the likeness of Truth, but speak to the capacity of his hearers. And though his language differ from the vulgar somewhat, it shall not fly from all humanity, with the Tamerlanes and Tamer-Chams of the late age, which had nothing in them but the scenical strutting and furious vociferation to warrant them to the ignorant gapers.
Página 162 - And who, in time, knows whither we may vent The treasure of our tongue, to what strange shores This gain of our best glory shall be sent, T' enrich unknowing nations with our stores?
Página 128 - Divers Voyages touching the Discoverie of America, and the Islands adjacent unto the same, made first of all by our Englishmen, and afterwards by the Frenchmen and Britons: And certaine notes of advertisements for observations, necessarie for such as shall hereafter make the like attempt, With two mappes annexed hereunto, for the plainer understanding of the whole matter.
Página 161 - I shall make you learn my favourite bit from an old poet, — ' Why should our pride make such a stir to be And be forgot ? What good is like to this, To do worthy the writing, and to write Worthy the reading and the world's delight ?' What I want, Rosy, is to do worthy the writing, and to write out myself what I have done. A man must work to do that, my pet.
Página 13 - VII. who then reigned, insomuch that all men with great admiration affirmed it to be a thing more divine than human, to sail by the west into the east where spices grow, by a way that was never known before...
Página 190 - Then glut thy sorrow on a morning rose, Or on the rainbow of the salt sand-wave, Or on the wealth of globed peonies ; Or if thy mistress some rich anger shows, Emprison her soft hand, and let her rave, And feed deep, deep upon her peerless eyes.
Página 169 - I'll have them fly to India for gold, Ransack the ocean for orient pearl...

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