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king recalled to him the duty he owed that supreme magistrate, the ace of hearts, the love due to God and our neighbor. "How is it," said the master," that you have always passed over the knave in your reckoning "" "Ah! I wished to speak no ill of that crooked disciple that went to backbite me to your honor." The reader anticipates the victory of the ingenious

rogue.

The purchasers of these sheets. sewed them as well as they could in a book form, but they were so thumbed and abused, that it is at this date nearly impossible to procure one of those repertories of song printed toward the close of the last or the beginning of the present century.

Of all these works that we delight in most at present, (it was not so when we were young,) is the unmatched "Academy of Compliments," which was the favorite of boys and girls just beginning to think of marriage, or its charming preliminary, courtship. Very feelingly did the writer in his preface insist on the necessity of eloquence. "Even quick and attractive wit," as he thoughtfully observed, "is often foiled for want of words, and makes a man or woman seem a statute or one dumb." He candidly acknowledges that several treatises like his have been published, "but he assures the courteous reader that none have arrived to the perfection of this, for good language and di

version."

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"I believe Nature brought you forth to be a scourge to lovers, for she hath been so prodigal of her favor toward you, that it renders you as admirable as you are amiable." Another form:

"Your presence is so dear to me, your conversation so honest, and your humour so pleasing, that I could desire to be with you perpetually."

The author directs a slight departure from this form, in case the gentleman has never seen the lady before, and yet has fallen passionately in love with her.

"If you accuse me of temerity, you must lay your own beauty in fault, with which I am so taken, that my heart is ravished from me, and wholly subjected to you."

Decent people would scarcely thank us for troubling them with many of the "witty questions and answers for the improvement of conversation." A few must be quoted, however, with discreet selection.

"Q. What said the tiler to the man when he fell through the rafters of his house?

"A. Well done, faith; I like such an assistant as thou art, who can go through his work so quickly.

"Q. What said the tailor's boy to the gentleman who, on his presenting his bill, said tartly, he was not running away?

"A. If you are not, sir, I am sorry to say my master is.

"Q. Why is a soldier said to be of such

great antiquity?

"A. Because he keeps up the old fashions when the first bed was upon the bare ground.”

THE BATTLE OF AUGHRIM.

It may appear strange that "The Battle of Aughrim," written by an adherent to the Hanoverian succession, should so long have continued a popular volume among the Roman Catholic peasantry. This has, perhaps, been due to the respectful style in which the author treated the officers of Irish

masters,

extraction. All his contempt and dislike were levelled at St. Ruth, the French General, and his English James and French Louis. Though the style of the rhymed play is turgid enough, there are in it occasional passages of considerable vigor and beauty, and a brisk movement in the conduct of the piece; and sentimental youth have an opportunity of shedding a tear over the ill starred love of Godfrey and Jemina. It was scarcely fair of the author to represent St. Ruth as a stabber in cold blood, but hear the moving periods he makes Sarsfield

utter:

"O heavens! can nature bear the shocking sound
Of death er slavery on our native ground,
Why was I nurtured of a noble race,
And taught to stare destruction in the face?
Why was I not laid out a useless scrub,
And formed for some poor hungry peasant's cub,
To hedge and ditch, and with unwearied toil
To cultivate for grain a fertile soil,

To watch my flocks, and range my pastures through,
With all my locks wet with the morning dew,
Rather than being great, give up my fame,
And lose the ground I never can regain ?"

Those Irishmen, who, like ourselves, have read and enjoyed this drama in early boyhood, before the birth of the critical faculty, will find it out of their power to divest themselves of early impressions when endeavoring to form a just estimate of its merits. We vainly strive to forget the image of a comely and intelligent country housewife, spiritedly reciting the interview of the Irish and English officers after the day was decided, and bravely holding out the tongs at the point where Sarsfield presents his weapon. Talmash, Mackay, and Sir Charles Godfrey confront the Irish chiefs, Dorrington, O'Neil, and Sarsfield, and Talmash courteously addresses them.

"Take quarters, gentlemen, and yield on sight, Or otherwise prepare to stand the fight. Yet pray, take pity on yourselves and yield, For blood enough has stained the sanguine field. 'Tis Britain's glory, you yourselves can tell, To use the vanquished hospitably well. Sarsfield-Urge not a thought, proud victor, if you dare,

So far beneath the dignity of war.

I am a peer, and Sarsfield is my name,

And where this sword can reach I dare maintain.
Life I contemn, and death I recommend;

He breathes not vital air who'd make me bend

My neck to bondage, so, proud foe, decline

The length of this, (extending his sword,) because the spot is mine.

and still is bound up with "The Battle of Aughrim," but there is nothing whatever in it to recommend it to the sympathies of the populace. There is nothing but mismanagement and bad feeling on the part of the native officers from beginning to end; and if fear or disloyalty shows itself in one of the besieged, his very wife cudgels him for it.

There is something very naïve and old-fashioned in the observation inserted at the end of the list of the dramatis personæ :

"Cartel agreed uponNo exchange of prisoners, but hang and quarter on both sides."

DON BELLIANIS OF GREECE; OR THE HONOR OF CHIVALRY.

The re-perusal of portions of this early favorite of ours has not been attended with much pleasure or edification. There is a sad want of style, accompanied by a complete disregard of syntax, orthography, and punctua tion. The objects to be attained are so many and so useless, one adventure branches off into so many others, and there are so many knights and giants to be overcome, and emperors so care

Talmash.-If you are Sarsfield, as you bravely lessly leave their empresses in the

show,

You're that brave hero whom I longed to know,
And wished to thank you on the reeking plain

For that great feat of blowing up our train.

Then mark, my lord, for what I here contend; 'Tis Britain's holy church I now defend, Great William's right, and Mary's crown, these three.

Sarsfield-Why, then fall on-Louis and James for me. (They fight.)"

Sarsfield's declaration ends the animated discussion rather lamely; but what poet has maintained a uniform grandeur or dignity? The writer was a certain Robert Ashton. The play when printed was dedicated, circa 1756, to Lord Carteret, and if peasant tradition can be trusted, it was only acted once. The Jacobite and Hanoverian gentlemen in the pit drew their swords on one another, probably at the scene just quoted, and bloodshed ensued. This is not confirmed by the written annals of the time.

"The Siege of Londonderry" was,

dark woods exposed to so many dangers, while they go themselves to achieve some new and futile exploit. that the narrative has scarcely more continuity and consistence than a dream.

The author had ten times as many separate sets of adventures to conduct simultaneously as ever had the estimable G. P. R. James. So he was frequently obliged to suspend one series, and take up another, a mode of composition which all novelists who read this article, are advised to eschew. Leaving Don Bellianis investing the emperor of Trebizond, who stoutly disputed the possession of the fair Florisbella's hand with him, he proceeds to tell what happened at the joustings of Antioch in consequence of the happy union of Don Brianel and the peerless Aurora. Thither came

Peter, the knight of the Keys, from Ireland. He was son to the king of Munster, and, being anxious to seek foreign adventures, embarked at Carlingford, and performed prodigies of valor in Britain and France, and then sailed for Constantinople. Being within sight of that city, a storm forced his ship away and drove it to Sardinia, where Peter won the heart of the fair princess, Magdalena, by his success in the tournament, and his beauty of features when he removed his helmet after the exercise. The princess has a claim upon our indulgence, for as the text has it, "he looked like Mars and Venus together." The knights of those happy times being as distinguished for modesty as courage, the princess ran no risk in desiring an interview with the peerless Peter, and they vowed constancy to each other till death.

a

A neighboring king demanding the hand of the lady for his son, the lovers decamp, and find themselves on strange island in a day or two. Peter having given the princess a red purse containing some jewels, she happened to let it fall by her, and it was at once picked up by a vulture, on the supposition of its being a piece of raw meat. Flying with it to a tree overhanging the river, and finding his mistake, he dropped it into the water, and there it lay on the sandy bottom in sight of the lovers.

The knight, arming himself with a long bough, and getting into the boat, would have fished up the purse, only for the circumstance of being unprovided with oars. The tide having turned, he was carried out to sea, and by the time he had got rid of his armor he was nearly out of sight of the poor princess, now left shrieking behind, who was conveyed away after a day and a night's suffering, in a ship bound for Ireland, where she took refuge in a nunnery, and in time became its superioress. This was near the palace of her lover's parents, and to match this strange coincidence by another equally strange, their cook, one day preparing a codfish for dinner, discov

ered within it the identical purse of jewels carried away by their son, and lost in the manner described in the distant Mediterranean. They gave him up then for lost, but he was merely searching through the world for his mistress, jousting at Antioch, killing a stray giant here or there, and rescuing from the stake at Windsor an innocent countess accused of a faux pas-all these merely to keep his hand in practice. Don Clarineo with whom he had fraternized at Antioch is also engaged on the same quest, and comes to Ireland in the course of his rambles. In that early time Owen Roe O Neill was chief king, MacGuire, father of Peter, was king of Munster as before stated, Owen Con O'Neill and Owen MacO'Brien ruled two of the other provinces, but the territory claimed by cach is not pointed out. The compiler was probably not well up in the old chronicles; he would else have given O'Brien the territory of Munster, and settled MacGuire somewhere near Loch Erin.

Be that as it may, the reigning king of Ulster refusing his fair daughter to the prince of Connaught, was minded to bestow her on the terrible giant Fluerston, whose inhospitable abode was in the mountains of Carlingford. The father of the rejected prince determined to resist this "family compact," sent out knights and squires to impress every knight errant they met into his service. Being rather more earnest than polite on meeting with Don Clarineo, he slew about a score of them, and after he succeeded in learning their business with him he was inclined to slay another score for their stupidity in not being more explicit at the beginning, whereas he would have devoted ten lives if he had them to the cause of prince versus giant.

Having easily massacred the Carlingford ogre, he began to bestir himself in his quest for the lost princess, and so quitted the Connaught court which according to our author was held at that era in Dublin, and his

To watch my flocks, and range my pastures through,
With all my locks wet with the morning dew,
Rather than being great, give up my fame,
And lose the ground I never can regain ?""

Those Irishmen, who, like ourselves, have read and enjoyed this drama in early boyhood, before the birth of the critical faculty, will find it out of their power to divest themselves of early impressions when endeavoring to form a just estimate of its merits. We vainly strive to forget the image of a comely and intelligent country housewife, spiritedly reciting the interview of the Irish and English officers after the day was decided, and bravely holding out the tongs at the point where Sarsfield presents his weapon. Talmash, Mackay, and Sir Charles Godfrey confront the Irish chiefs, Dorrington, O'Neil, and Sarsfield, and Talmash courteously addresses them.

"Take quarters, gentlemen, and yield on sight, Or otherwise prepare to stand the fight. Yet pray, take pity on yourselves and yield, For blood enough has stained the sanguine field. 'Tis Britain's glory, you yourselves can tell, To use the vanquished hospitably well. Sarsfield-Urge not a thought, proud victor, if you dare,

So far beneath the dignity of war.

I am a peer, and Sarsfield is my name,

And where this sword can reach I dare maintain.
Life I contemn, and death I recommend;

He breathes not vital air who'd make me bend
My neck to bondage, so, proud foe, decline

The length of this, (extending his sword,) because the spot is mine.

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The objects to be attai

so many and so useless, one a branches off into so many oth there are so many knights an to be overcome, and emperors

Talmash. If you are Sarsfield, as you bravely lessly leave their empresses

show,

You're that brave hero whom I longed to know,
And wished to thank you on the reeking plain

For that great feat of blowing up our train.
Then mark, my lord, for what I here contend;
'Tis Britain's holy church I now defend,
Great William's right, and Mary's crown, these
three.

Sarsfield. Why, then fall on-Louis and James for me. (They fight.)"

Sarsfield's declaration ends the animated discussion rather lamely; but what poet has maintained a uniform grandeur or dignity? The writer was a certain Robert Ashton. The play when printed was dedicated, circa 1756, to Lord Carteret, and if peasant tradition can be trusted, it was only acted once. The Jacobite and Hanoverian gentlemen in the pit drew their swords on one another, probably at the scene just quoted, and bloodshed ensued. This is not confirmed by the written annals of the time.

"The Siege of Londonderry" was,

dark woods exposed to so ma gers, while they go themse achieve some new and futile that the narrative has scarce continuity and consistence dream.

The author had ten times a separate sets of adventures to simultaneously as ever had t mable G. P. R. James. So he quently obliged to suspend one and take up another, a mode position which all novelists wh this article, are advised to! Leaving Don Bellianis invest emperor of Trebizond, who disputed the possession of Florisbella's hand with him, ceeds to tell what happened joustings of the hars the p

in consequ

Brian Thithe

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Peler, the knight of the Keys, from ered within it the identical purse of
Munster, and, being anxious to seek lost in the manner described in the
Ireland He was son to the king of jewels carried away by their son, and
foreign adventures, embarked at Car- distant Mediterranean. They gave
ford, and performed prodigies of him up then for lost, but he was merely
alor in Britain and France, and then searching through the world for his
led for Constantinople. Being with- mistress, jousting at Antioch, killing a
right of that city, a storm forced stray giant here or there, and rescuing
his ship away and drove it to Sardinia, from the stake at Windsor an innocent
here Peter won the heart of the fair countess accused of a faux pas-all
incess, Magdalena, by his success in these merely to keep his hand in prac-
tournament, and his beauty of fea- tice. Don Clarineo with whom he
when he removed his helmet af- had fraternized at Antioch is also en-
the exercise. The princess has a gaged on the same quest, and comes
upon our indulgence, for as the to Ireland in the course of his rambles.
t has it, he looked like Mars and In that early time Owen Roe O Neill
us together." The knights of those was chief king, MacGuire, father of
each is not pointed out. The compiler
times being as distinguished for Peter, was king of Munster as before
sty as courage, the princess ran stated, Owen Con O'Neill and Owen
skin desiring an interview with MacO'Brien ruled two of the other
peerless Peter, and they vowed provinces, but the territory claimed by
was probably not well up in the old
chronicles; he would else have given
O'Brien the territory of Munster, and
settled MacGuire somewhere near
Loch Erin.

cy to each other till death.
Aneighboring king demanding the
od of the lady for his son, the lovers
and find themselves on a
Aage island in a day or two. Peter
g given the princess a red purse
ing some jewels, she happened
pix fall by her, and it was at once
ded up by a valture, on the suppo-
on of its being a piece of raw meat.
ng with it to a tree overhanging
river, and finding his mistake, he
opped it into the water, and there it
on the sandy bottom in sight of

Be that as it may, the reigning king
of Ulster refusing his fair daughter to
the prince of Connaught, was minded
to bestow her on the terrible giant
Fluerston, whose inhospitable abode
on of ana e pact," sent out knights and squires to
was in the mountains of Carlingford
The father of the rejected prince de
termined to resist this "family com
The knight, armning himself with a impress every knight errant they e
The tide having of them, and after he succeeded
bough, and getting into the boat, into his service. Being rather ra
fould have fished up the purse, only earnest than polite on meeting wi
r the circumstance of being unpro- Don Clarineo, be slew about a 800
arned, he was carried out to sea, and learning their business with hitn
the time he had got rid of his armor was inclined to slay another score
was nearly out of sight of the poor their stupidity in not being more
princess, Dow left shrieking behind, plicit at the beginning, whereas
who was conveyed away after a day would have devoted ten lives if he b
and a night's suffering in a ship bound them to the cause of prince ver
for Ireland, where she took refuge in giant.
A monnery, and in me became its su-

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