A Series of Metric Tables: In which the British Standard Measures and Weights are Compared with Those of the Metric System at Present in Use on the Continent

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Lockwood and Company, 1864 - 124 páginas
 

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Página xiii - May one thousand eight hundred and twenty-five, the Straight Line or Distance between the Centres of the Two Points in the Gold Studs in the Straight Brass Rod, now in the Custody of the Clerk of the House of Commons, whereon the Words and Figures
Página i - The Metric System. A SERIES OF METRIC TABLES, in which the British Standard Measures and Weights are compared with those of the Metric System at present in use on the Continent. By CH DOWLING, CE Second Edition, revised and enlarged.
Página xi - An English penny called a sterling, round and without any clipping, shall weigh thirty-two wheatcorns in the midst of the ear; and twenty pence do make an ounce, and twelve ounces a pound: and eight pounds do make a gallon of wine, and eight gallons of wine do make a bushel, which is the eighth part of a quarter...
Página xiii - May 1825, the standard brass weight of one pound troy weight, made in the year 1758, now in the custody of the clerk of the House of Commons, shall be, and the same is hereby declared to be the original and genuine standard measure of weight...
Página xiii - Standard be considered as the foundation of all legal Weights and Measures, and that it be declared, that the length of the pendulum vibrating seconds in a vacuum, on the level of the sea, in London, is 39-13929 inches, and that of the French metre, 39-37079 inches, the English standards being employed at 62
Página xi - that by the consent of the whole realm of England, the measure of our Lord the King was made, viz, an English penny called a sterling, round and without clipping, shall weigh 32 wheat corns in the midst of the ear; and 20 pence do make an ounce, and 12 ounces a pound; and 8 pounds do make a gallon of wine, and 8 gallons of wine do make a bushel, which is the eighth part of a quarter.
Página x - The words of this statute are as follows: — ' Beef, pork, mutton, and veal shall be sold by weight called Haver-du-pois. No person shall take for a pound of beef or pork above ob. (a halfpenny) , nor for a pound of mutton or veal above ob. q. (three farthings), and less in those countries where they be sold for less/
Página xiv - ... that the Avoirdupois pound be adopted instead of the Troy pound as the Parliamentary standard of weight, the avoirdupois pound being invariably known and generally used, and the Troy pound being wholly unknown to the great mass of the British population, and comparatively useless.
Página xiii - Fahrenheit, ha« been found equal to the length of a pendulum supposed to vibrate seconds in London, on the level of the sea, and in a vacuum. 2. That the parliamentary standard Troy pound, according to the twopound weight made in 1758, remain unaltered ; and that 7000 Troy grains be declared to constitute an avoirdupois pound ; the cubic inch of distilled water being found to weigh at 62 deg.
Página xii - ... were sent to Paris, and one of them was returned, having the Paris halftoise, containing three Paris feet, marked upon it. Copies of the avoirdupois and troy pounds were, at the same time, sent to Paris, and a standard of two marcs, or sixteen Paris ounces, was returned. In 1758 a select committee of the House of Commons was appointed, ' to inquire into the original standards of weights and measures in this kingdom, and to consider the laws relating thereto.

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