The Works of the Right Honourable Joseph Addison, a New Ed., with Notes: Poems

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T. Cadell and W. Davies, 1811
 

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Página 43 - Profuse of bliss, and pregnant with delight! Eternal pleasures in thy presence reign, And smiling plenty leads thy wanton train; Eas'd of her load, subjection grows more light, And poverty looks cheerful in thy sight: Thou mak'st the gloomy face of nature gay, Giv'st beauty to the sun, and pleasure to the day.
Página 211 - TO wake the soul by tender strokes of art, To raise the genius and to mend the heart, To make mankind in conscious virtue bold, Live o'er each scene, and be what they behold...
Página 221 - Tis not in mortals to command success, But well do more, Sempronius; we'll deserve it.
Página 45 - I bridle in my struggling Muse with pain, That longs to launch into a nobler strain.
Página 60 - Inspired repulsed battalions to engage, And taught the doubtful battle where to rage. So when an angel by divine command With rising tempests shakes a guilty land, Such as of late o'er pale Britannia...
Página 183 - For, wit lying most in the assemblage of ideas, and putting those together with quickness and variety wherein can be found any resemblance or congruity, thereby to make up pleasant pictures and agreeable visions in the fancy...
Página 55 - Here shattered walls, like broken rocks, from far Rise up in hideous views, the guilt of war, Whilst here the vine o'er hills of ruin climbs, Industrious to conceal great Bourbon's crimes, At length the fame of England's hero drew, Eugenio to the glorious interview. Great souls by instinct to each other turn, Demand alliance, and in friendship burn; A sudden friendship, while with stretched-out rays They meet each other, mingling blaze with blaze.
Página 287 - It must be so — Plato, thou reasonest well — Else whence this pleasing hope, this fond desire, This longing after immortality ? Or whence this secret dread, and inward horror, Of falling into naught ? Why shrinks the soul Back on herself, and startles at destruction ? 'Tis the divinity that stirs within us; 'Tis Heaven itself that points out an hereafter, And intimates eternity to man.
Página 304 - Th' assembled deities survey'd. Great Pan, who wont to chase the fair, And lov'd the spreading oak, was there ; Old Saturn too, with upcast eyes, Beheld his abdicated skies ; And mighty Mars, for war renown'd, In adamantine armour frown'd ; By him the childless goddess rose, Minerva, studious to compose Her twisted threads ; the web she strung. And o'er a loom of marble hung : Thetis, the troubled ocean's queen Match'd with a mortal, next was seen, Reclining on a funeral urn, Her short-liv'd darling...
Página 37 - Mincio draw his watery store, Through the long windings of a fruitful shore, And hoary Albula's infected tide O'er the warm bed of smoking sulphur glide.

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