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Contents.

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BIRDS AND FLOWERS, AND OTHER

COUNTRY THINGS:
The Stormy Peterel. ...
The Poor Man's Garden...

110
111

158

Page

Page

The Water-Rat ....

147 Song for the Ball-Players....

184

The Sparrow's Nest

ib.

The Kitten's Mishap...

185

The Kingfisher.....

148 Spring

ib.

Migration of the Grey Squirrels

ib. Life among the Mountains.

186

The Beaver

149

Pilgrims....

ib.

True Story of Web-Spinner.

ib. The Cowslips.

187

Spring

151 The Indian Bird..

ib.

The Northern Seas

152 The Children's Wish

189

The Southern Seas

ib. The English Mother.

ib.

The Garden

153 The Departed......

190

The Lion........

151 A Poetical Chapter on Tails

ib.

The Fox

ib.

The Wood-Mouse

155 MISCELLANEOUS PIECES.....

192

The Spider and the Fly

ib.

The Tailor Bird's Nest and the Long-Tail

The Voyage with the Nautilus..

ib.

Deliciæ Maris....

193

Titmouse Nest ...

156

The Humming-Bırd..

Flowers ....

ib.

194

The Ostrich..

The Sale of the Pet Lamb of the Cottage., 195

157

The Dormouse

ib.

196

The Fairy Oaih

The Wild Fritillary.

Child's Faith

ib.

197

The Squirrel....

America.....

ib.

The Dragon-Fly....

The Doomed King.

ib.

200

The Wild Spring-Crocus

ib.

The Dream of Peticius.

203

The Swallow

Lodore, a Summer Vision..

ib.

159

The Sea

Du Guesclin's Ransom

ib.

204

The Household Festival..

205

TALES IN VERSE:

The Three Ages

ib

Olden Times.....

160 Mourning on Earth

206

Madam Fortescue and her Cat

161 Rejoicing in Heaven.

ib.

Andrew Lee ....

164 The Temple of Juggernaut

207

The Wanderer's Return..

ib. Household Treasures

ib.

A Swinging Song

166 The Mosque of Sultan Achmet

ib.

Ellen More

ib. The Source of the Jumna

208

A Day of Disaster

167 The Baron's Daughter

209

The Young Mourner

168

Smyrna

210

The Bear and the Bakers..

169 Oliver Cromwell

ib.

The Soldier's Story

171 Marshal Soult.....

ib.

Marien Lee.....

172 The Valley of the Sweet Waters..

211

The Child's Lament

ib. The Burial-Ground at Sidon

ib.

The Sailor's Wife

173 The Arrival

212

The Morning Drive

174 An English Grave at Mussooree..

213

The Found Treasure.

175

The Odalique

214

Thoughts of Heaven.

176 The Tomb of St. George

ib.

A Day of Hard Work..

ib. Vespers in the Capelle Reale

215

The Old Man and the Carrion Crow 177 Newcastle-upon-Tyne....

ib.

May Fair.....

178 View near Deobun, among the Himalayas . 216

French and English.

179 The New Palace of Mahmoud II.

217

The Little Mariner

ib. The Monastery of Santa Saba

ib.

The Snow Drop.

180 The Gipsy Mother's Song..

ib.

A Poetical Letter..

181 The Ordeal of Touch

218

Alice Fleming

182 The Andalusian Lover

ib.

One of the Vanities of Human Wishes 183 Installation of the Bishop of Magnesia

The Garden

184 A Forest Scene in the days of Wickliffe ... 220

10

THE

POETICAL WORKS

OF

MARY HOWITT.

The Seven Temptations.

What's done we partly may compute,
But know not what's resisted. - Burns.

TO

ITT

ALARIC A. WATTS, ESQ. THIS VOLUME IS INSCRIBED, BY HIS SINCERE FRIEND,

THE AUTHOR.

PREFACE.

degree, at the shapes of atrocity into which some of them are transformed; and learn to bear with others

as brethren, who have been tried tenfold beyond our The idea of this poem originated in a strong impres- own experience, or perhaps our strength. sion of the immense value of the human soul, and of all the varied modes of its trials, according to its own working out of this moral process, in this poem, may

The evil agent whom I have employed for the infinitely varied modifications, as existing in different either be regarded literally, as he is represented, individuals. We see the awful mass of sorrow and according to the popular creed ; or simply, as a perof crime in the world, but we know only in part-in sonification of the principle of temptation, as each a very small degree, the fearful weight of solicitations individual reader's own bias of sentiment may lead and impulses of passion, and the vast constraint of him to prefer: for my own part, I regard him in the circumstances, that are brought into play against latter point of view. suffering humanity. In the luminous words of my

There may be some who may not approve of the motto,

extent of crime which I have brought into action in What's done we partly may compute, the course of these dramas. They may deem the But know not what's resisted.'

experiment especially dubious in a female writer. Thus, without sufficient reflection, we are furnished But let such reflect, that without high temptation with data on which to condemn our fellow-creatures, there could be no high crime; without high crime but without sufficient grounds for their palliation and there could be no actual and adequate representation commiseration. It is necessary for the acquisition of human nature, as we know it to exist. And of that charity, which is the soul of Christianity, for therefore to have flinched in this respect, would have us to descend into the depths of our own nature; to been to defeat the whole object of my work. Let put ourselves into many imaginary and untried situa- those reflect also, that it has not been my plan to tions, that we may enable ourselves to form some render the description of crime alluring. In that tolerable notion how we might be affected by them; case I should have deserved, not only all the blame how far we might be tempted - how far deceived the timid or the rigidly righteous could heap upon how far we might have occasion to lament the evil me, but also that of the philosophical observer of our power of circumstances, to weep over our own weak- nature; for my view of it then would have been ness, and pray for the pardon of our crimes; that, false and injust. But I have painted the career of having raised up this vivid perception of what we crime such as it is—one uniform downward tendency might do, suffer and become, we may apply the rule to degradation and ruinous misery; and have thereby to our fellows, and cease to be astonished in some held up to young and old, to strong and weak, to

THE POOR SCHOLAR.

THE MOTHER.
LITTLE BOY.

the high and the lowly of earth, the most important ours thou murmurest against : it is for less than this moral lesson that the light and darkness of this that he obtained them !" strange life can teach to tried, allured, rational yet " You shall see,” said Achzib exultingly, "what I corruptible, intellectual yet sense-involved beings will do. I will select seven human beings, and tempt the most important we are capable of giving or them according to their several natures ; and if I receiving.

prove not beyond dispute the superior power of evil, The scenes, characters, and events in these dramas let me be called tenfold, Achzib the liar!" are, as in human life, exceedingly various, and ex- "Be it so!" replied the other two. ceedingly diversified in their degrees of moral purity or turpitude; but if they are allowed only to be such Achzib was upon earth. He took up his abode in as fall really within the scope of our nature, they a famous city, and assuming the character of a phineed no defence, for they must be full of lessons of losopher, inquired out their most learned men. All wisdom and of stimulus to good.

told him of a poor scholar. Achzib saw him and conversed with him. He found him young, worn out with study, and as simple, unpractised and inexperienced in the ways of men as a child. This shall

be my first essay, said Achzib; and accordingly, acTHE SEVEN TEMPTATIONS.

cumulating learned treatises and immeasurably long parchments of puzzling but unsound philosophy, he made his attempt.

Whether Achzib or the Poor

Scholar triumphed, shall be seen. In a gloomy chaotic region of universal space inhabited by the Spirits of Evil, who, enraged at their expulsion from heaven, still endeavoured to revenge themselves upon the justice of God, by over

THE POOR SCHOLAR. turning or defacing the beauty of his moral creation in the spirit of man, sate three of the lower order of

PERSONS. Spirits. Among them was, Achzib the liar, or the runner to and fro-a restless, ambitidus spirit, who,

ACHZIB, THE PHILOSOPHER. hating good, coveted distinction among the bad.

For a long time they had sate in silence, each occupied by his own cogitations; and there is no telling how much longer they might have remained so, had not the attention of the youngest been diverted by a

The Scholar's Room. - Evening. gloomily magnificent procession, which was dimly

THE POOR SCHOLAR AND LITTLE BOY. seen passing in the distance.

Little Boy, reading. "These things I have spoken “ Another of the favoured ones,” said he, “is this unto you, that in me ye might have peace. In the day crowned !"

world ye shall have tribulation: but be of good cheer, “Ay," replied Achzib, “it is an easy thing for I have overcome the world." Here endeth the 16th some to obtain distinction! I have desired it for long; chapter of the Gospel according to St. John. I have done services to merit it; but my merits, like Poor Scholar. Most precious words! Now go your my desires, are fruitless."

way ; * Hast thou,” inquired the eldest of the three, The summer fields are green and bright; "proved the supremacy of evil? hast thou shown Your tasks are done. - Why do you stay? that we are stronger than God ?"

Christ give his peace to you: Good night! “I have done much,” said Achzib,

Boy. You look so pale, sir! you are worse ; know !"

Let me remain, and be your nurse! * But, if thou have failed to do this,' rejoined the Sir, when my mother has been ill, other, “ thou canst not have deserved the distinction I've kept her chamber neat and still, thou desirest!"

And waited on her all the day! “ But that is soon done!" answered Achzib.

Schol. Thank you! but yet you must not stay; “ Not so soon!" interrupted the youngest spirit. Still, still my boy, before we part “ I have tried to prove it till I am weary; and now Receive my blessing - 'tis my last! I unreluctantly make the confession, that though we I feel Death's hand is on my heart, are mighty, God is mightier than we—his mercy is And my life's sun is sinking fast; stronger than our hate, his integrity than our craft!" Yet mark me, child, I have no fear,

“I deny all this,” said Achzib, “and I will prove 'Tis thus the Christian meets his end : it beyond controversy! I will directly ascend to the I know my work is finished here, earth: and of the human spirits whom I will tempt, And God - thy God too-- is my friend! I will win the greater number, if not all of them, to The joyful course has just began; their ruin!"

Life is in thee a fountain strong ; "If thou do this," said the eldest spirit, “thou wilt Yet look upon a dying man, indeed deserve to be crowned like him whose hon- Receive his words and keep them long!

as ye

all

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