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CANADIAN WICKEDNESS.

(From the Montreal Gazette, December 12th.)

Our American cousins, possessing as they do so many excellent qualities and so great material resources, might be very happy if they were not tormented with a desire to sit on both sides of a fence at the same time—a feat in itself difficult even to our highly gifted neighbors.

It is a matter of notoriety to our readers that United States publishers have always seized and reprinted any English books they wished for; that these reprints have been exported into every British colony ; that they are with difficulty kept out of England itself; and that every effort which England has made to secure international copyright has utterly come to naught. With cynical frankness, Senator Morrill, in his report to the United States Senate in 1873, asserts that to give the foreign author any consideration would injure the printers and papermakers of the United States, and raise the price of books to the people, and that therefore an international copyright was impossible. The English press railed, the English Government coaxed, but all in vain. The proposition is a sound one; it is cheaper to steal brooms than to buy them.

Matters being in this state, two years ago the Canadian Government revised the copyright law of this country, and the new act provided that two classes of persons only could hold copyright in Canada: 1st. Any person domiciled in Canada or in any part of the British possessions ; and, 2d. A citizen of any country which might have an international treaty with Great Britain. The essence of the act is in the word domiciled. Mere colorable residence will not do. Therefore, it soon became evident to Canadian printers that, so long as the United States Government refused international copyright, so long the whole range of United States literature might be reprinted with impunity, and, inasmuch as the frontier is long and travel incessant,and the facilities of the post-office are very great, these reprints would incessantly find their way across the border. Here, then, Senator Morrill was beaten with his own stick. The very thing so nice and proper for United States citizens ought clearly to be equally nice and proper for Canadian citizens.

The New York publishers, however, who for a century have grown rich on English literature, no sooner found that the Canadian reprints of their copyright books began to appear in the Western States than they were horror-stricken at the enormity of Canadian wickedness. The Sun took the matter up, interviewed the leading publishers, and exhorted the impenitent Canadians in the same style which the English authors had found so ineffectual in Senator Morrill's case. The interview with Mr. G. W. Carleton is excessively amusing.

Mr. Carleton goes on at white heat. But he has conceded that the Canadian has a right to sell these reprints in Canada. Now if American citizens send money to Canada and buy these books, and import them into the United States, as Mr. Carleton says they do, it seems to us that the " devils" and the "fellows" are on his own showing not Canadians at all, but his own countrymen. Canadians are doing precisely what he is doing himself. His edition of Dickens is advertised everywhere. If a Ca

nadian were to send him the money for a set, or for a volume of Swinburne's poems, would any fine scruples prevent him sending them by post or express? We think not. We never heard of an American publisher whose feelings were so tender. If such there be, it would be worth a pilgrimage to see him. Mr. Carleton, after flopping round and flinging about naughty words in this style, finally settles down to, "All this must lead to an interational copyright law at an early day, I hope," in which pious sentiment we heartily concur. The English authors will now, we trust, see that the Canadian Copyright A ct is not the dreadful thing they supposed it to be when they raised such an outcry about it, and will learn that when they sit down to trade knives with Brother Jonathan they should not commence by giving away their own jackknife first.

THE PARIS EXPOSITION. M. Em. Terquem, under date December 14. 1878, informs us that the packing of the unsold goods displayed in the American book exhibit at the Paris Exposition has been completed, and that the cases, twenty-two in number, will be shipped in the Supply for New York, and in the Constitution for Philadelphia. Both vessels are expected to sail from Havre about the middle of this month, and will probably reach America late in February. A return invoice has been sent to every exhibitor, so that there may be no difficulty in claiming the goods after their arrival here. A considerable proportion of the goods sent have been sold abroad. M. Terquem is informed by Governor MacCormick that our government will open an office either at Washington or in New York to distribute the medals and diplomas awarded. M. Terquem intends to be in New York before March.

LITERARY AND TRADE NOTES.

The 78th part of Braithwaite's Retrospect, for January, will be ready for delivery about the 20th inst., by W. A. Townsend.

Prof. A. W. Ward has undertaken to write on Chaucer, and Mr. Henry James, Jr., on Hawthorne, for the admirable series of Englisk Men of Letters, edited by John Morley.

Mr. A. Hildebrandt, of Manchester, is to be the publisher of the proposed monthly Technological Index, to contain "all the material requisite for easy reference to all articles of scientific or technical interest."

Messrs. Rivington's new volume of iheir Historical Biographies,"'The Duke of Wellington," by R. Waite, is just ready for publication. It contains a portrait of the Duke, eight plans of the principal battles, and three maps.

Messrs. W. Collins, Sons & Co. have in preparation a set of thirty large plates illustrative of Old Testament history, and designed to display the references and facilitate the study of Rawlinson's "Historical Illustrations of the Old Testament."

Porter & Coates have nearly ready an interesting book by "Trebor," entitled " As it may happen," and "Voices from Babylon," by Jos. A. Seiss, whose " Miracle in Stone" made quite a sensation and passed through several editions.

J. Fairbanks & Co. have just ready a volume of papers on social topics by T. DeWitt Talmage, entitled *' Foes of Society." Next week they will issue "The Mask Torn Off," by the same author. F. O. Evans & Co. are the New York agents for these books.

S. W. Tilton & Co., Boston, have recently issued two interesting art-books for amateurs, "Art Needlework for Decorative Embroidery," edited by Lucretia P. Hale, and the first series of "Flaxman's Outline Designs," for artstudies and decorative purposes.

We regret to announce the death of Uzal D. Ward, treasurer of the American and Foreign Bible Society, aged sixty-one years. Mr. Ward was for thirty years identified with the book trade in this city, his place of business at the time of his death being at 150 Nassau street.

"The history of the Israelites, and Judeans," by N. E. DeGroot, will be published shortly in this city by the author, who has applied the recent discoveries in the East to elucidate several disputed points in ancient history and chronology. The work will be issued in two volumes, at $4.

The Life of Cobden, tounded upon materials furnished by his representatives and friends, to which Mr. John Morley is at present devoting his leisure, is well advanced, and will, it is expected, appear next May. Mr. Morley was

chosen for the task on the recommendation of Mr. John Bright.

The two volumes of Half Hours with Modern Scientists ( Van Nostrand ), being the ten parts of the popular University Series, with an introduction by Noah Porter, have been reduced in price from $1.50 to $1.25 per volume. These volumes embrace lectures and essays by Professors Huxley, Barker, Stirling, Cope, Tyndall, Wallace, Roscoe, Huggins, Lockyer, Young, Mayor, and Rood.

Davis, Bardeen & Co. have just ready rhe first number in School Room Classics, entitled "Unconscious Teaching," by Rev. F. D, Huntington, Bishop of Central New York. Early next month they will issue "On the Province of Methods in Teaching," by Jas. H. Hoose, principal of the Cortland State Normal School, and favorably known as the author of "Studies in Articulation."

Claxton, Remsen& Haffelfinger will have ready shortly the promised book on " The Art of Reading," by Ernest Legouve, member of the French Academy. The work will be translated by Edward Roth, and will have an index of illustrative notes mainly bibliographical, and a portrait of the author. About the middle of next month a new revised edition will be ready of Brother Azarias' " Essay on the Philosophy of Literature."

BOOKS WANTED.

H. D. Chapin, Cor. Madison And Dearborn Sts.,

Chicago, 111.

London Illustrated News. Vols, i to 14 inclusive ; Vols. 22

and 38, and all balance. Henneypen's Novels.

State condition and price.

John P. Dks Forges, Baltimore, Md.

Adams' Works. Vols. 6t 7, 8. 8°, cloth.

Congressional Debates. Vol. 14, 2 parts.

Aphra Behn's Plays, etc. Reprint.

Annals of Congress: 3d Congress ; 7th Congress, 2d Session.

Vol. 2. R. Wodrow. Sufferings of the Church of Scotland from the

Restoration to the Revolution. Bledsoe's Southern Review, No. 41.

D. G. Francis, 17 Astor Place, N. Y.

a Cabeca de Vaca. Tr. by Buckingham Smith. N. E. Hist, and Geneal. Register, July, 1866. Also Vols. 16 and 18.

B. Wbstermann & Co., 524 Broadway, New York.

American Journal of Obstetrics, 1877 (Vol. X.)

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SCIENTIFIC MEMOIRs, being Experimental Contributions to a Knowledge of Radiant Energy. By John William DRAPER, M.D., LL.D., President #he %. of Science in the University of New York, author of “A Treatise on Human Physiology. History of the Intellectual Develop:

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VIEW. By Prof. O. N. Rood. EDCUCA TION AS A SCIENCE. By Prof. Bain. BRAINS AS AN ORGAN OF MIND. By Dr. H.

Charlton Bastian. THE CRA YFISH: An Introduction to the Study of

Zoology. By Professor Huxley.
THE STARS. By Prof. Secchi.

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THE ART OF EXPERIMENTING WITH CHEAP
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DESTRUCTION AND RECONSTRUCTION. Personal Experiences of the Late War. By Richard Taylor, Lieutenant-General in the Confederate Army. Small Svo.

A new edition of PREHISTORIC TIMES. By Sir John Lubbock.

OCEAN WONDERS: A Companion for the Seaside.

By William E. Damon. Fully illustrated. BEECHER'S LECTURES TO YOUNG MEN.

THE LORD'S PR A YER. By the Rev. Geo. D. BoardMan, D.D., author of " The Creative Week." (In January.)

THE ENGLISH REFORMA TION. By the Rev. CunNingham Geikie, D.D., author of "Life of Christ."

ELEMENTARY LESSONS IN ENGLISH GRAMMAR. By Richard Morris. (In January.)

BIBELOTS AND CURIOS. A Manual for Collectors. By Frederic Vors. (Shortly.)

COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS OF THE SEAS; Or, Marine Contributions to Food, Industry, and Art. By P. L. Simmonds. Small 8vo, 500 pages. Illustrated. (In January.)

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MODERN FISHERS OF MEN among th. Various Sexes, Sects, and Sets of Chartville Church and Community. (In January.)

MY GUARDIAN. By Ada Cambridge. (In January.) HEAL TH, AND HOW TO PROMOTE IT. By RichArd Mcsherry, M.D., Professor of Practice of Medicine, University of Maryland j President of Baltimore Academy of Medicine, etc. A PRIMER OF THE NA TURAL RESOURCES OF THE UNITED STA TES. By J. H. Patton. Uniform with School Science Primer Series.

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GEOGRAPHY OF GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND. By John Richard Green and Alice Stopkord Grbbn. With Maps. iSmo.

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