Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

DLAGRAM 6. -- Per cent of the population enrolled as secondary students in private and public

secondary schools for a series of years.

[blocks in formation]

DIAGRAM 7.Showing number of college students each year since 1872.

[graphic][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed]

DIAGRAM 8.-Showing rhet per cent of the total population was enrolled as college students

during each year since 1872.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small]

II.-LEGAL PROVISIONS GOVERNING THE PRACTICE OF MEDICINE

IN THE SEVERAL STATES.

In the following pages is given a synopsis of the legal requirements for admission to the practice of medicine in the several States and Territories of the United States. The medical laws of nearly all of the States and Territories are of comparatively recent date, and this compilation in les the provisions of law in ten States and Territories enacted in 1903. In all cases where the laws provide for reciprocity of licensure with other States and Territories or with foreign countries that fact is stated. Following the requirements of each State are given the name and title of the officer to whom application for license should be made.

Alabama.-Examination by the State board of examiners, or before one of the county boards. The latter can examine only the graduates of medical colleges indorsed by the State Medical Association. There is no provision for reciprocity of licensure with other States. Dr. W. H. Sanders, Chairman of State Board of Medical Examiners, Montgomery, Ala.

Arizona.--"The law provides for the issuance of license to those who are residents of Arizona, are of the age of 21, and are of good moral character, and who in addition (1) present diploma and pass examination; or (2) present diploma and show certificate of license under the laws of 1901 or 1897; or (3) have practiced for five successive years previous to the passage of the act and pass an examination.” a (Act of March 19, 1903.) Dr. William Duffield, Secretary of the Territorial Board of Medical Examiners, Phoenix, Ariz.

Arkansas.-Examination before one of the three State boards of medical examiners. No provision in the law for the recognition of licenses of other States. (Act of 1903.) Dr. J. P. Runyan, Secretary of the State Medical Board of the Arkansas Medical Society, Little Rock, Ark.; Secretary of the Homeopathic State Medical Board,

- Secretary of the Eclectic State Medical Board, California.—Examination before the State board of medical examiners. The candidate must have graduated from a medical college, the requirements of which equal those prescribed by the Association of American Medical Colleges. Reciprocity is provided for by law with the District of Columbia or any State or Territory, provided the legal requirements in such State or Territory are equal to those of California, and such State or Territory will recognize the certificate of California. (Act of February 27, 1901.) Dr. George G. Gere, Secretary of State Board of Medical Examiners, San Francisco, Cal.

Colorado.-Examination or diploma of a recognized medical college. Only residents of Colorado are registered. Dr. S. D. Van Meter, Secretary of State Board of Medical Examiners, Denver, Colo.

Connecticut.-Examination and diploma of a recognized medical college. No reciprocity provision. (Act of June 11, 1901.) Dr. C. A. Lindsley, Secretary of State Board of Health, New Haven, Conn.

Delaware.-Examination, a medical diploma, and a competent common-school education. Applicants licensed by other States having requirements equal to those demanded by the State of Delaware may be licensed without examination. (Acts of April 18, 1895, and March 16, 1899.) Dr. P. W. Tomlinson, Secretary of State Medical Council, Wilmington, Del.

District of Columbia.-Examination and medical diploma after study of medicine for three years if the diploma was granted prior to June 30, 1898, or four years if granted after that date. The law provides for reciprocity of licensure.

(Act of

a Provisions of the new medical law of Arizona as given by the Jour. A. M. Assoc., Apr. 4, 1903.

ED 1902-VII

June 3, 1896.) Dr. W. C. Woodward, Secretary of the Board of Medical Supervisors, Washington, D. C.

Florida.-Examination and diploma of a recognized medical college. No provision for reciprocity. (Act of May 17, 1895.) There are nine boards of medical examiners, one representing each of the seven judicial districts, one the homeopaths, and one the eclectics.

Georgia. --Examination and diploma of a recognized medical college. There is no provision for reciprocity. (Act of December 12, 1894.) Dr. J. B. S. Holmes, Secretary of the Board of Examiners of the “Regular School of Medicine,” Atlanta, Ga.; Dr. R. E. Hinman, Secretary of the Homeopathic Board of Examiners, Atlanta, Ga.; Dr. M. T. Salter, Secretary of the Eclectic Board of Examiners, Atlanta, Ga.

Idaho.-Examination and diploma of a reputable medical college. There is no provision for reciprocity of licensure. (Act of 1889.) Dr. R. L. Nourse, Secretary of the State Board of Medical Examiners, Hailey, Idaho.

Illinois.—Examination and diploma of a recognized medical college. The law permits the granting of licenses without examination to graduates of Illinois medical colleges, but the board requires all to pass the examination. Reciprocity of licensure is provided for by the board. Dr. J. A. Egan, Secretary of the State Board of Health, Springfield, Ill.

Indiana.-Examination and diploma of a reputable medical college. Anyone who matriculated in a recognized medical college in Indiana prior to January 1, 1901, and who, with a diploma from such school, makes application for a license prior to January 1, 1905, shall be granted a certificate without examination. The law provides for reciprocity with other States. Dr. W. T. Gott, Secretary of the State Board of Medical Registration and Examination, Crawfordsville, Ind.

Iowa.- Examination and graduation from a recognized medical college having a four years' course of study of not less than twenty-six weeks each. There is no provision for reciprocity. Dr. J. F. Kennedy, Secretary of State Board of Medical Examiners, Des Moines, Iowa.

Kansas.-(1) Examination after study of medicine four periods of not less than six months each; or, (2) a license may be granted without examination to graduates of medical schools in good standing of the United States or foreign countries; or, (3) licenses may be granted on the certificate of any board of examination of any other State or Territory of the United States or any foreign country. (Act of March 22, 1901.) Under date of March 20, 1903, the State board published a circular letter stating: “No registrations will be made on diplomas or certificates from other State boards.” Dr. H. W. Roby, Secretary of State Board of Medical Registration and Examination, Topeka, Kans.

Kentucky.-(1) Diploma from a reputable medical college of Kentucky, or (2) from some reputable medical college of some other State or country, indorsed as such by the State Board of Health. (Act of 1898.) Dr. J. N. McCormack, Secretary of State Board of Health, Bowling Green, Ky.

Louisiana.-Examination and diploma of a medical school in good standing and a fair elementary education. No provision for reciprocity. (Act of July 13, 1894.) Dr. F. A. Larue, Secretary of the Board of Medical Examiners representing the Louisiana State Medical Society, New Orleans, La.; Dr. Gayle Aiken, Secretary of the Board of Medical Examiners representing the Ilahnemann State Medical Society, New Orleans, La.

Maine.-Examination and graduation from a medical college in good standing, maintaining a standard of preliminary education and of medical instruction approved by the board. Provides for reciprocity with other States on rules and regulations made by the board and approved by a justice of the supreme judicial court. (Act of March 22, 1901.) Dr. A. K. P. Meserve, Secretary of Board of Registration of Medicine, Portland, Me.

[ocr errors]
« AnteriorContinuar »