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Prof ssional schools (Chapter XXXVI).-— The statistics of professional schools show but little variation from those of the preceding year. For five successive years there has been a decrease in the number of theological students. The number now is 7,343, smaller by 204 than the number of the preceding year, and smaller by 1,028 than the number in 1898.

Since 1891 the numbers in law and dentistry have nearly trebled. There are now 102 law schools, with 13,912 students; 56 dental schools, with 8,420 students; 59 schools of pharmacy, with 4,127 students. Medical schools number 15+, with 26,821 students, of whom 1,551 are homeopathic students.

igricultural and mechanical colleges (Chapter XXXVII). — These institutions owe their origin to an act of Congress approved July 2, 1862, granting to each State in the Union 30,000 acres of land for each Representative to which it was entitled in Congress. The total amount of land reported as having been received under this act is 10,320,813 acres, of which 9,385,863 acres have been sold. The proceeds derived from the sale of the lands amount to $11,126,531, an average of about $1.19 per acre. The income derived therefrom amounts to $684,141, or about 6.1 per cent on the principal. Under an act of Congress approved August 30, 1890, each State and Territory receives annually $25,000 for the support of these institutions. The total income for the year ended June 30, 1902, was $9,167,059, of which amount $2,000,060 was derived from Federal sources and $1,253,257 was contributed by the sereral States and Territories. The amount given by the States and Territories exceeds the amount for the previous year by $1,179,521. The property held by the agricultural and mechanical colleges is valued at $69,660,303, the additions thereto during the year amounting to over $3,000,000.

The total number of students reported by these institutions was ,47,017, of which number 30,787 were enrolled in the agricultural and mechanical departments. Of the latter number, 4.908 were reported by institutions for colored students, the remainder being in attendance at institutions for white students and at institutions in which no distinction is made in the admission of students on account of race or color. The reports show that 4,547 students were enrolled in short or special courses.

A brief summary of the legislation enacted during the year affecting these institutions is given in the chapter, as well as changes in courses of study and brief descriptions of new buildings. A short statement concerning the first session of the Graduate School of Agriculture is also included. All of which is respectfully submitted.

W. T. IIARRIS,

Commissioner. The SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR.

I. STATISTICS OF STATE SCHOOL SYSTEMS.
II. LEGAL PROVISIONS GOVERNING THE PRACTICE OF MEDICINE

IN THE SEVERAL STATES.
III. LEGAL PROVISIONS GOVERNING THE PRACTICE OF DENTISTRY

IN THE SEVERAL STATES.

ED 1902-V

LXV

1.-STATISTICS OF STATE SCHOOL SYSTEMS.

Table 1.- The total population, the school population, and the adult male population.

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North Altantic Division:

Maine.
New Hampshire
Vermont.
Massachusetts (1901)
Rhode Island
Connecticut..
New York.
New Jersey

Pennsylvania.
South Atlantic Division:

Delaware (1900)..
Maryland (1901)
District of Columbia
Virginia
West Virginia.
North Carolina
South Carolina
Georgia (1901)

Florida
South Central Division:

Kentucky.
Tennessee (1901).
Alabama.
Mississippi (1901)
Louisiana.
Texas
Arkansas
Oklahoma

Indian Territory.
North Central Division:

Ohio
Indiana.
Illinois,
Michigan (1901)
Wisconsin (1901)
Minnesota
Iowa
Missouri
North Dakota.
South Dakota.
Nebraska

Kansas..
Western Division:

Montana (1901)
Wyoining (1900)
Colorado..
New Mexico
Arizona
Ctah
Nevada
Idaho
Washington
Oregon.
California.

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Table 2.- Density of population, urban population, nativity and race classification, value of

manufactures, illiteracy, and relations of the adult male and of the school population. [NOTE.—The statistics in this table, except those in column 12, are from the U. S. Census of 1900.]

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7.7

16.6 19.8 31.3 35. 7

4.5 33.3 58.4 46.7 43.7

101. 42

82. 62 101.53 30. 91 33. 20 22. 10 18. 44 21.85 40.06

110.3

97.0 138,4 76.4 83.9 06.3 61.1 67.7 85.4

7.1
5.1

.9
12. 2
10.7
18.9
12.3
11.8
8.3

17.6
10.7

5.0
10.5
22.5
5.7
5.2

42.7
40,5
26.1
52.5
37.8
53.1
54,7
56.4
39.4

31.8
31.3
27.0
32. 4
31.1
33.6
33.2
31.1
34.0

26.5 27.9 21.7 31.6 30.8 33.3 31.6 33, 4 30.9

.6 3. 7

9.2

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North Atlantic Div.:
Maine.

23. 2 23. 7 New Hampshire 45.7 39.6 Vermont.

37.6 11.2 Massachusetts 348.9 67.0 Rhode Island 407.0

66.1 Connecticut.

187.5 52.0 New York,

152.6

68.5 New Jersey

250.3 61.2
Pennsylvania. 140.1 45.5
South Atlantic Div.:
Delaware

94.3 41.4 Maryland.

120.5 16.9 Dist. of Columbia. 4,645.3 100.0 Virginia

46.2 1 14.7 West Virginia.

39.9
North Carolina 39.0 5.1
South Carolina. 44.4 7.5
Georgia

87.6 11.0 Florida

9.7 15.0 South Central Div.: Kentucky

53. 7 16.9 Tennessee.

48,4 13.4 Alabama.

35.5 7.3 Mississippi

33. 5 2.6 Louisiana

30.4 22.8 Texas

11.6 11.3 Arkansas

24.7 5.4 Oklahoma

10.3 5.0
Indian Territory. 12.6 0.0
North Central Div.:
Ohio

102.0 38.5 Indiana

70.1

24.2 Illinois.

86, 1 47.1 Michigan

42.2 30.9 Wisconsin

38.0 30.7 Minnesota

22.1

26.8 Iowa

40.2 16,8 Missouri

45.2 30.8 North Dakota..

4.5 3.0 South Dakota,

5.2

2.6 Nebraska

13.9 13.8 Kansas,

18.0

14.0 Western Division: Montana.

1.7 27.0 Wyoming

..9 24. 1 Colorado.

5.2 38.1 New Mexico

1.6 0.0 Arizona

1.1 0.0 Utah

25.2 Nevada

0.0 Idaho

1.9 0.0 Washington.

7.7 31.9 Oregon.

4.4 23.9 California.

2.3 13. 3
.9 23.8

45.3
.5 58.7
3.7 47.2
5,8 20.4
1.1 28.0
3. 9
1.2 22.8

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73.8

70.9
89.4
76.0

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67.4
78.3
81.2
85.5
57.4
79.4
63.3
82.0
76.1
82.4
73,2

3.4

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9.5 43.7

a Including Mongolians and Indians.

b Less cost of raw material.

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