Sporting Magazine

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Rogerson & Tuxford, 1833
 

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Página 210 - Ever charming, ever new, When will the landscape tire the view! The fountain's fall, the river's flow, The woody valleys warm and low; The windy summit, wild and high, Roughly rushing on the sky; The pleasant seat, the ruined tower, The naked rock, the shady bower; The town and village, dome and farm, Each give each a double charm, As pearls upon an Ethiop's arm.
Página 211 - A double dungeon wall and wave Have made — and like a living grave, Below the surface of the lake The dark vault lies...
Página 285 - What, though you tell me each gay little rover Shrinks from the breath of the first autumn day: Surely 'tis better when summer is over To die when all fair things are fading away.
Página 21 - There have been tears and breaking hearts for thee, And mine were nothing, had I such to give ; But when I stood beneath the fresh green tree, Which living waves where thou didst cease to live, And saw around me the wide field revive With fruits and fertile promise, and the Spring Come forth her work of gladness to contrive, With all her reckless birds upon the wing, I turn'd from all she brought to those she could not bring.
Página 78 - Drink of this cup, you'll find there's a spell in its every drop 'gainst the ills of mortality. Talk of the cordial that sparkled for Helen ! Her cup was a fiction, but this is reality (Barclay and Co.'s). If they ever send it in a flat state, complain to the Governor. Yours, RS" " RS ! " said Kit, after some consideration.
Página 119 - But quiet to quick bosoms is a hell, And there hath been thy bane ; there is a fire And motion of the soul which will not dwell In its own narrow being, but aspire Beyond the fitting medium of desire ; And, but once kindled, quenchless evermore, Preys upon high adventure, nor can tire Of aught but rest ; a fever at the core, Fatal to him who bears, to all who ever bore.
Página 358 - ... ranging to distant downs and commons even in windy weather, which the other species seem much to dislike ; nay, even frequenting exposed sea-port towns, and making little excursions over the salt water. Horsemen on wide downs are often closely attended by a little party of swallows for miles together, which play before and behind them, sweeping around, and collecting all the skulking insects that are .roused by the trampling of the horses
Página 357 - In defence of my opinion about the nightingales, I find Chaucer, — who of all poets seems to have been the fondest of the singing of birds, — calls it a merry note, and though Theocritus mentions nightingales six or seven times, he never mentions their note as plaintive or melancholy...
Página 305 - Who hath sent out the wild ass free? Or who hath loosed the bands of the wild ass? Whose house I have made the wilderness, And the barren land his dwellings. He scorneth the multitude of the city, Neither regardeth he the crying of the driver. The range of the mountains is his pasture, And he searcheth after every green thing.
Página 22 - STAKES of 50 sovs. each, h. ft. for three yrs. old colts, 8st. 71b.; and fillies, 8st. 21b.; the owner of the second horse received 100 sovs. out of the Stakes, and the winner paid 100 sovs. towards the expences of additional police-officers.

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