History of Europe: From the Fall of Napoleon, in 1815, to the Accession of Louis Napoleon, in 1852, Volumen2

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W. Blackwood and sons, 1853
 

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Contenido

Want of industry in the national character
9
The physical circumstances of Spain favoured commerce but not manufac tures
10
Effect of the longcontinued hostility with the Moors
11
Impolitic laws of Spain in regard to money
12
Important effect of the Romish faith
13
Difference of the towns and country in respect of political opinion
14
Disposition of the army
15
The church
16
State of the peasantry
17
State of the nobility 19 Huge gap in the revenue from the loss of the South American colonies
19
how it was formed
20
Its extreme democratic tendency
21
Utter unsuitableness of the constitution to the generality of Spain
22
Universal unpopularity of the Cortes and constitution
23
Influence of the Cortes on South America
24
effect of the removal of the seat of government to Rio Janeiro
25
Its general adoption of English habits and ideas
26
their number and condition
27
Character of Ferdinand VII
28
Universal unpopularity of the Cortes
29
Universal transports in Spain at this decree and the kings return
33
Decree of Valencia
38
Further violent proceedings of the king and Porliers revolt
39
The king resolves to support him
41
Double marriages of the royal families of Spain and Portugal
48
VOL II
49
14
50
Reception of the revolution at Barcelona Valencia and Cadiz
73
15
74
16
80
Page 251
82
17
106
19
107
20
108
Cause of the wretchedness of Ireland
116
His character
118
Dreadful famine in the south and west of Ireland
122
Abortive conspiracy in Barcelona and death of General Lacy
124
B Unity of feeling in the whole empire
131
t Great power given by the Tchinn
137
Condition of the exiles in Siberia
142
Way in which it is carried into effect
143
Expiatory ceremony on the Place of the Senate
144
Great reforms in all departments introduced by the emperor
145
Great legal reforms of the emperor
146
Crime of the insurgents
147
Coronation of the emperor and empress at Moscow
148
Character of the Emperor Nicholas and parallel between him and Peter in the Great
149
Character which these circumstances have imprinted on the Russians
150
His personal appearance and failings
151
21
155
Treaty regarding the Queen of Etruria
160
Causes of the revolt in the Isle of Leon
166
Death of Alexanders natural daughter
211
And death
217
How this came about
223
Information given of the conspiracy to Alexander
229
Nicholas advances against the rebels
236
Leaders of the revolt in the army of the south
243
Reflections on this event
249
ROYALIST REACTION IN FRANCE FRANCE FROM THE COUP DETAT OF 5TH MARCH 1819 TO TIE ACCESSION OF THE PURELY ROYA...
263
265
265
270
270
22
271
14 Increasing violence and exasperation of the press 15 Budget of 1819
275
Preparations for the election of 1819
278
de Serres TES
279
23
282
24
283
25
284
28
286
236
288
Louvel his assassin
291
Chateaubriands words on the occasion
297
Violent attacks on the new ministry by the press 25 Kings speech at opening the session 26 Comparative strength of parties in the Chamber 27 Design...
299
Character of M Decazes
304
Yellow fever at Cadiz
314
Answer by the Ministerialists
325
Military conspiracy headed by Lafayette
331
Birth of the Duke of Bordeaux
338
276
349
A currency based on the precious metals is always liable to fluctuations
387
Strain on the money market from the immense loans on the Continent
393
237
396
277
399
29
400
281
402
Noble conduct of Lord Sidmouth on the occasion
406
Meeting of Parliament and measures of Government
414
the king accepts the constitution
416
246
417
Birth of Queen Victoria
420
Conflict in the dark in the Cato Street loft
426
Outbreak of the insurrection and its suppression
432
Measures for the relief of the agricultural classes
505
Repeated defeats of Ministers in the House of Commons
515
Its provisions
521
Its provisions
522
Political changes in progress from the resumption of cash payments
528
Massacre at Cadiz
530
284
571
Proceedings of the Cortes and progress of the civil war
591
his appearance and character and followers
593
Desperate assault of Cervera
594
His character as a statesinan and orator
595
Great extension of the civil war
596
Deplorable state of the Spanish finances
599
Commencement of the strife between the guard and the garrison ib 64 Departure of the royal guard from Madrid
600
Progress of the negotiations with the insurgents
601
Attack of the guards on Madrid and its defeat
602
Destruction of the royal guard
603
Defeat of the insurgents in Andalusia and Cadiz
604
Change of ministry and complete triumph of the revolutionists
605
The new ministry and provincial appointments
606
Murder of Geoiffeux ib 72 Second trial and execution of Elio
607
Civil war in the northern provinces
609
Vigorous measures of the revolutionary government
610
Capture of Castelfollit and savage proclamation of Mina
611
Continued disasters of the Royalists and flight of the regency from Urgel
612
CHAPTER XII
614
Effect of these events in France and Europe
615
Lamartines observations on the subject
616
Opposite views which prevailed in Great Britain
617
Repugnance to French intervention
618
Danger of a renewal of the family compact between France and Spain
619
Influence of the South American and Spanish bondholders
620
Immense extent of the Spanish and South American loans
621
Views of the Cabinet and Mr Canning on the subject
622
Congress of Verona agreed on by all the powers
623
Members of the Congress there
624
Description of Verona
625
Views of the different powers at the opening of the Congress
626
Brilliant assemblage of princesses and courtiers at Verona
627
Treaty for the evacuation of Piedmont and Naples th 16 Resolution of the Congress regarding the slavetrade
628
Note of England regarding South American independence
629
Instructions of M de Villèle to M de Montmorency regarding Spain
630
Mr Cannings instructions to Duke of Wellington
631
Measures adopted by the majority of the Congress on the subject
632
Views of what had occurred in this Congress
635
The warlike preparations of France continue
641
Mr Canning adopts the principle of noninterference
654
Immense sensation produced by this speech
664
Dramatic scene at his expulsion
670
Portrait of Mr Canning by M Marcellus
676
Forces and their disposition on both sides
682
Entry of the Duke dAngoulême into Madrid
688
Its provisions
694
Defeat and capture of Riego
700
Resumed negotiations at Cadiz and assault of Santa Petri
701
Deliverance of the king and dissolution of the Cortes
702
Scene at his deliverance
703
First acts of the new Government ib 92 Loud calls on Ferdinand for moderation and clemency
704
Sentence of Riego
705
Entry of the king and queen into Madrid
706
Distracted and miserable state of Spain
708
State of Portugal during this year Royalist insurrection
709
Royalist counterrevolution
710
Triumphant return of the Duke dAngoulême to Paris
711
Offer of assistance by Russia to France rejected
712
101102 Views of Mr Canning in recognising the republics of South America 713715
713
Mr Canning did not give independence to South America but only acknowledged it
716
Recognition of the South American republics by Mr Canning
717
Effects of this measure on British interests
718
de Chateaubriands designs in regard to the South American states
719
Speech of Mr Canning at Plymouth
720
The elections of 1824 and strength of the Royalists
721
Great effect which this had on the future destinies of France
722
Meeting of the Chambers and measures announced in the royal speech
723
considerations in favour of it ib 112 Argument on the other side
724
Law for the reduction of interest of the national debt
725
285
726
Which is passed by the Deputies but thrown out by the Peers 7 26
727
288
728
Statistics of France in this year
729
Reign of Louis XVIII draws to a close ib 120 His declining days
730
His great powers of conversation
731
His religious impressions in his last days
732
Character of Louis XVIII
733
His private qualities and weaknesses
734
Political inferences from the result of the Spanish revolution
735
Great merit of the French expedition into Spain in 1823
736
It had nearly established the throne of the Restoration
737
The French invasion of Spain was justifiable
738
Was the English intervention in behalf of South America justifiable?
739
Its ultimate disastrous effects to England
740
i
741
59

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Página 717 - It would be disingenuous, indeed, not to admit that the entry of the French army into Spain was, in a certain sense, a disparagement — an affront to the pride— a blow to the feelings of England...
Página 467 - ... from the roots and the stem of the tree. Save that country, that you may continue to adorn it; save the Crown, which is in jeopardy, the aristocracy, which is shaken; save the altar, which must stagger with the blow that rends its kindred throne!
Página 717 - I have already said that, when the French army entered Spain we might, if we chose, have resisted or resented that measure by war. But were there no other means than war for restoring the balance of power? Is the balance of power a fixed and unalterable standard?
Página 717 - Spain might be rendered harmless in rival hands, — harmless as regarded us, and valueless to the possessors ? might not compensation for disparagement be obtained, and the policy of our ancestors vindicated, by means better adapted to the present time ? If France occupied Spain, was it necessary, in order to avoid the consequences of that occupation, that we should blockade Cadiz? No: I looked another way; I sought materials of compensation in another hemisphere. Contemplating Spain such as our...
Página 467 - Save the country, my lords, from the horrors of this catastrophe ; save yourselves from this peril ; rescue that country of which you are the ornaments, but in which you can flourish no longer, when severed from the people, than the blossom when cut off from the roots and the stem of the tree.
Página 398 - The Prince Regent has the greatest pleasure in being able to inform you, that the trade, commerce, and manufactures of the country are in a most flourishing condition. " The favourable change which has so rapidly taken place in the internal circumstances of the United Kingdom, affords the strongest proof of the solidity of its resources. " To cultivate and improve the advantages of our present situation will be the object of your deliberations...
Página 637 - ... opinion, that to animadvert upon the internal transactions of an independent state, unless such transactions affect the essential interests of his Majesty's subjects, is inconsistent with those principles on which his Majesty has invariably acted on all questions relating to the internal concerns of other countries ; that such animadversions, if made, must involve his Majesty in serious responsibility, if they should produce any effect ; and must irritate, if they should not...

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