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By Mr

Celestial Phenomena from July 1. to October 1. 1832, calculated

for the Meridian of Edinburgh, Mean Time. GEORGE INNES, Astronomical Calculator, Aberdeen. The times are inserted according to the Civil reckoning, the day beginning at midnight

- The Conjunctions of the Moon with the Stars are given in Right Ascension.

JULY.

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22.

.

. 2. 2. 3. 4. 7. 8. 8. 9. 9. 11.

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H.
15 38
22 0 23

1 34 40
13 38 43

8 2
23 24 31
1 58 4
2 41 16
3 7
5 56 31
8 14 22
0 16 30
6 59 15
7 41 2
7 3 53
9 30 38
15 1 10
22 47 55
17 23 35
5 15 40
10 14 19
13 42 4
12 32 54
12 36 39

D. og II

20. og

21.
Im. II. sat. 4 21.
oh

21.
Sup. Ó O $
) First Quarter. 22.
Im. I. sat. 4 23.
d) 7

23.
o $ * I

23. o ) @ Oph. 23. ó ão t

23. Im. IV. sat. 4

24. ó ) 1 e

25. ó ) 2

26. ó Dot

26. ós o

26.
of 8 II

27.
O Full Moon.
• Ders

27.
Ó) H
o ) o 18

28.
o 15 1:29.
d) ?

30. Ó)

30.

H.
21 55 43

4 35 7
10 56 30
18 40 13
15 13 1
22 15 21

0 14 18
11 54 35
13 9 15
13 38 2
18 29 39
18 43 22
14 10 34
1 32 19
3 14 11
22 42 9

9 24 36
13 49 1
14 19 18
21 44
22 8 36
4 32
2 8 20
3 20 8

( Last Quarter. o ) o ) 2 Ceti.

Ceti. onfo O enters 8 Im. I. sat. 4 o) y 8 o )188 o ) 288 o ) a 8 o ) § ó ) , II Em. III. sat. 4 Ó) $ Im. II. sat. 4 Sup. • OP

New Moon. Ó) 8 8 x 5 op doo Ó) $ Im. I. sat. 4 o Dh

11.

11.

12.

27.

12. 12. 12. 14. 15. 15. 16. 18. 20.

27.,

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AUGUST-continued.

D. 18. 18. 18. 19. 19. 19. 19. 19. 20. 20. 21. 21. 22.

H. 1 3 28 17 34 48 22 6 25

6 23 7 17 4 19 24 54 20 41 59 21 11 42 2 12 44 3 14 12 3 15 14 23 20 52 2 19 37

D.

Å di ci si

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2 3. 3. 4. 4. 4. 5. 6. 6. 7. 7. 7. 7. 8. 9. 10. 10. 11. 11. 12. 13. 13. 14. 14.

H. 19 11 15" I 17 31 8 40 19 54 55 20 36 59

D.
22.
23.
23.
24.
25.
26.

o D ke Ceti.
d D
ó) f 8
( Last Quarter.
o ur
o ) y 8
6) 188
o ) 2 8 8
o ) a
op 32

१४
o D II
Im. I. sat. 4

H.
12 485

4 43 45
20 48 17

3 11 25
21 32 55
10 41 53
18 58 6

4 9
22 25 0
22 42 52

2 48 44
16 39 19
18 45

o ) & II O enters my Im. I. sat. 4 o ) Sodo

New Moon. ó) osh

26.

27.
27.
30.
31.
31.
31.

Im. II. sat. 4
Im. I. sat. 4
o Ph
o Da
• 2

SEPTEMBER.

D.
16.
16.
16.
16.
17.
17.
18.
18.
18.
19.
20.
21.

Im. IV. sat. 4
OD 188
Ó) 288
8 04
Ó) $ 8
( Last Quarter.

22.

1 0 59
19 594
22 25 52
4 15
0 13 17
22 27 55
0 37 36
6 14 19
14 7 27
22 58 17
2 24 24
2 48
5 17 25
16 38 33
3 13 25
3 36 57
11 5 26

0 10 2
22 42 37
2 29 41
2 32 30
6 34 46
3 40 15
21 1 13
21 43 9

ó) Q Oph.
) First Quarter.
o
ollu
o ) 2 u
Im. II. sat. 4
o so
ó la
ó h
D Bm
Im. III. sat. 4
Im. I. sat. 4

ó Dave
OH
ó Dors
ÓD S vs
Inf. Ó O
O Full Moon.
Ó) 4
Ꮷ Ꮚ Ꮛ
Im. II. sat.
of me

)
Ó ) 2 g Ceti.
Im. III. sat. 4
Im. I. sat. 4
o ) se Ceti.
o D f 8
Im. I. sat. 4
Ó) 8

23.
23.
23.
23.
24.
24.
24.
25.
27.
28.
28.
28.
29.
30.
30.
31.

H.
1 28 '17
2 28 25
2 58 31
13 17 37

9 35 45
13 26 37
4 33
6 12 57
20 4 24

2 19 40
11 40 27
22 12 59
21 22
1 9 2
1 14 8
10 31 17
13 56 9

6 47 19
19 37 52
20 32
9 28 46
3 22 24
1 38 18
10 11 51
0 48 29
3 45 4
3 4 15
7 3
18 15 28

o ) , II
Ó) $ II
ó) 8
o ) Soo
Em. II. sat. 4
Ó) $
Em. I. sat. 4
O enters -
oh
Ólome

New Moon. Em. I. sat. 4 o greatest elong. ÓD og 2 Ó Do

ó Dom Em. II. sat. 4 o ) @ Oph. Em. I. sat. 4 Ở near h o oso

14.

15.

15. 15.

Times of the Planets passing the Meridian, and their Declination.

176

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Celestial Phenomena from July 1. to October 1. 1832.

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SCIENTIFIC INTELLIGENCE.

METEOROLOGY.

1. First View of Sierra Leone.-Dr Boyle, in his interesting work on the medical topography of the western coast of Africa, says, “ There are very few parts in the tropical world which at first sight hold out more allurements, even to the experienced traveller, than Sierra Leone. Its splendid scenery, and its beautiful river, together with its extensive, commodious, and generally secure harbour, and pleasant-looking town and villages, are calculated to excite the most flattering hopes in respect of health and enjoyment, notwithstanding strong previous impressions with regard to the contrary. On making Sierra Leone from the north, the mountains from which the peninsula was named first excite attention. They are lofty, perpetually clothed, from their summits to their bases, in all the fertile gaity of Nature's verdant scenery ; and there is a pleasing and endless variety in the outline of their countless peaks and declivities. As the ship draws in with the shore, signs of cultivation appear, and increase with rapidity, both in number and attractiveness. Freetown, and the lately formed villages in its neighbourhood, at first appear like anomalous patches in the view; but on a nearer approach, they add greatly to its beauty and its interest. When the ship has arrived just at that point of distance from which a person may see all the broad outlines and apparent characteristics of an extensive scene, without being able to discern the minute details, the effect is magnificent. On the left hand is the Bulloon shore, low, but covered with luxurious and richly coloured bush, an occasional palm and pullom tree, rising in graceful form above the neighbouring mangroves :-in appearance it seems to embody the notions formed of fairy-land, but its realities most sadly illustrate the folly of such dreams. The middle ground also occurs on the left hand, and it gives a variety to the view. In front are the spacious river, extending farther than the eye can reach, and the north side of the peninsula, with its lofty mountains, and Freetown, running to the wa

VOL. XIII. NO. XXV.---JULY 1832.

M

ter's edge, and surmounted by the barracks, and protected by a handsome fort, and a coast, forming small and convenient bays, from the town to its termination at the Cape, which runs boldly into the sea. On the right is the Atlantic. That a scene, composed of such ostensible material features, is grand and imposing, may readily be supposed; but those who are ignorant of the peculiarities of a tropical climate, and its seductive influence on a stranger, can form no adequate notion of the character and extent of its actual power. For the moment home is forgotten; or if remembered, the remembrance is accompanied with a desire it should be situated in such a seeming paradise. In thus speaking of the view on arriving at Sierra Leone, we are supposing the settlement to be made on a fine clear day, when the atmosphere is bright and comparatively devoid of malaria, and the river runs its natural course, unswollen, and free from discoloration. Should the arrival, however, happen at a different period, when the atmosphere is dense, oppressive, and fraught with deleterious exhalations, and the rains are deluging the face of the country, and at once augmenting the river, and destroying its beauty, then Sierra Leone presents a very different appearance; there is nothing to excite a pleasing anticipation, but there is a world of causes for apprehension and for dread. The realities of the scene are, of course, unaltered, for the two periods are the property of the climate, and must be alike endured by the colonists; but the appearances present a melancholy and fearful contrast."

2. Description of an African Tornado.--The seasons at Sierra Leone are divided into the wet and the dry. The latter is generally ushered in by the explosion of two or three tornados, which, although formidable in themselves, are still so long connected with the approach of a pleasant time, as that the inhabitants have sometimes prayed for their appearance. One of those strange commotions of nature is thus described by Mr Boyle:"A violent tornado appears to strangers a most ap: paling visitation, and produces an extraordinary effect upon their feelings. It consists of successive flashes of the most vivid lightning, tremendous shocks of thunder, rapidly and alarmingly reiterated, impetuous gusts of wind, deluging rain. This terrific combination of the elements sweeps along the whole of

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