Tales from American History, Volumen2

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J. & J. Harper, 1833
 

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Página 2 - In conformity to the act of Congress of the United States. entitled, " an act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts, and books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies, during the time therein mentioned." And also to an act, entitled, " an act, supplementary to an act, entitled, an act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts, and books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies, during the times therein mentioned...
Página 17 - ... they had climbed up the greater part of that steep ascent, Balboa commanded his men to halt, and advanced alone to the summit, that he might be the first who should enjoy a spectacle which he had so long desired. As soon as he beheld the South Sea stretching in endless prospect below him, he fell on his knees, and, lifting up his hands to heaven, returned thanks to God, who had conducted him to a discovery so beneficial to his country, and so honourable to himself. His followers, observing his...
Página 233 - In this book," answered Valverde, reaching out to him his breviary. The Inca opened it eagerly, and turning over the leaves, lifted it to his ear : " This," says he, " is silent ; it tells me nothing : " and threw it with disdain to the ground. The enraged monk, running towards his countrymen, cried out, " To arms, Christians; to arms, the word of God is insulted; avenge this profanation on those impious dogs.
Página 216 - Behold those lofty mountains," continued he, pointing to the south ; " beyond these lies a mighty sea, which may be discerned from their summit. It is navigated by people who have vessels almost as large as yours, and furnished, like them, with sails and oars. All the streams which flow down the southern side of those mountains into that sea abound in gold ; and the kings who reign upon its borders eat and drink out of golden vessels. Gold, in fact, is as plentiful and common among those people of...
Página 77 - ... namely, crocodiles, and serpents. The serpents were kept in large casks or vessels ; the crocodiles in ponds, which were walled round. There were also, various ponds, for fish, two of which, that are remaining and still beautiful, we have seen in the palace of Chapoltepec, two miles from Mexico. Montezuma, who was not satisfied with having every sort of animal in his palace, also collected there all irregularly formed men, who either from the colour of their hair, or of their skin, or some other...
Página 146 - According to the accounts even of those authors who are most disposed to exaggerate the sufferings of the Indians, they, in several provinces, enjoy not only ease but affluence; they possess large farms ; they are masters of numerous herds and flocks ; and, by the knowledge which they have acquired of European arts and industry, are supplied not only with the necessaries, but with many luxuries of life 1.
Página 80 - All daily burned incense to their idols ; no house was without censers ; the priests, fathers of families, and judges offered incense to the four principal winds. But incense-offering among the Mexicans and other nations of Anahuac was not only an act of religion towards their gods, but also a piece of civil courtesy to lords and ambassadors.
Página 77 - One of these woods was upon an island in the lake, known at present, among the Spaniards, by the name of Pinon. " Of all these palaces, gardens, and woods, there is now remaining the wood of Chapoltepec only, which the Spanish Viceroys have preserved for their pleasure. All the others were destroyed by the conquerors. They laid in ruins the most magnificent buildings of antiquity, sometimes from an indiscreet zeal for religion, sometimes in revenge, or to make use of their materials, They neglected...

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